Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Impairment of the ability to solve mathematical problems, usually resulting from brain dysfunction.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Difficulty with numbers and in doing arithmetic.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. impaired ability to learn grade-appropriate mathematics

Etymologies

dys- + calcul(ate) + -ia1.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From dys-, from Ancient Greek δυς- (dus-, "bad") + calculate, from Latin calculare. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • A poor performance on such tasks is termed dyscalculia or acalculia and is associated with dominant hemisphere often parietal dysfunction.

    The Neuropsychiatric Guide to Modern Everyday Psychiatry

  • Live Science examines the neuropsychology of numbers, and 'dyscalculia' - impairment in the ability to do mathematical operations.

    Mind Hacks: 2006-03-24 Spike activity

  • Ben and I share something called dyscalculia, or, simply stated, math dyslexia.www. dyscalculia.org, an individual with dyscalculia may have accelerated language skills, poetic and creative ability, and a good visual memory.

    courierpress.com Stories

  • Recent discoveries point at the fact that a medical condition known as dyscalculia, similar in some ways to dyslexia, is responsible for some people not being able to handle even daily calculations, such as paying for products and receiving their change.

    Softpedia News - Global

  • Another focus of Stanislas Dehaene’s work is a condition called dyscalculia, or number blindness, in which one’s number sense is defective.

    HERE’S LOOKING AT EUCLID

  • It is called dyscalculia and it is just starting to get the attention that dyslexia has gotten.

    Like dyslexia, is there a condition that affects ones ability to do math? « Literacy Skills « Literacy Help « Literacy News

  • Understanding dyscalculia has a social urgency, since adults with low numeracy are much more likely to be unemployed or depressed than their peers.

    HERE’S LOOKING AT EUCLID

  • It is estimated, in fact, that academic papers on dyslexia outnumber those on dyscalculia by about ten to one.

    HERE’S LOOKING AT EUCLID

  • Neuroscientist Brian Butterworth, of University College London, frequently writes references for people he has tested for dyscalculia, explaining to prospective employers that the failure to achieve school math qualifications is not due to laziness or lack of intelligence.

    HERE’S LOOKING AT EUCLID

  • If you have dyscalculia, however, it can take up to three seconds.

    HERE’S LOOKING AT EUCLID

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