Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A word of uncertain meaning (perhaps a loading, burdening, restraint) in the following passage:

Etymologies

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Examples

  • Ah! je me ha ` is bien de tout le mal que je vous cause; trois journ ` ees de route, autant de nuits d ` etestables, une embarquement, un passage, le risque de mille accidens, voil ` a le bien que je vous procure.

    The Letters of Horace Walpole, Earl of Orford — Volume 3

  • In the first of these, dated from Lisbon, March, 1662, Creed wrote: "My Lord Embassador doth all he can to hasten the Queen's Majestie's embarquement, there being reasons enough against suffering any unnecessary delay."

    The Diary of Samuel Pepys, Mar/Apr 1661/62

  • 'I delivered your letter this evening and had a long conference with both the Ministers: Mr. Choiseul assured me upon his word of honour that Your R.H. should be inform'd in time before the departure of Mr. de Gouillon, {309a} so that you might go with that embarquement if you thought proper, upon which I interrupted him and told him if they were destined for the Kingdom of Ireland that it would be to no manner of purpose, for I was certain you would not go, and that you had at all times expressly ordered me to tell them so; he continued his conversation and said you should be equally informed when the P. of S. {309b} embarked.

    Pickle the Spy; Or, the Incognito of Prince Charles

  • Embassador doth all he can to hasten the Queen's Majestie's embarquement, there being reasons enough against suffering any unnecessary delay. "

    Diary of Samuel Pepys — Complete

Comments

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  • "embarguement; < OF. embarquement, taking ship, putting into a ship, loading: see embarkment. Embargo does not appear to have been in use in any form in Shakspere's time.'>Occurring in the following passage in Shakspere, where some editions have embarguement; < OF. embarquement, taking ship, putting into a ship, loading: see embarkment. Embargo does not appear to have been in use in any form in Shakspere's time. A word of uncertain meaning (perhaps a loading, burdening, restraint) in the following passage:

    The prayers of priests, nor times of sacrifice,

    Embarquements var. embarguements all of fury.

    Shak., Cor., i. 10."

    --The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

    January 5, 2011