Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun Inflammation of the epiglottis.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Inflammation of the epiglottis.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun pathology Inflammation of the epiglottis.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun inflammation of the epiglottis; characterized by fever and a severe sore throat and difficulty in swallowing

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From epiglottis + -itis.

Examples

  • Hib can also cause severe swelling in the throat due to a condition called epiglottitis, which, if not treated immediately, results in infected tissue slowly sealing off the victim's windpipe until he suffocates to death.

    NPR Topics: News

  • Hib can also cause severe swelling in the throat due to a condition called epiglottitis, which, if not treated immediately, results in infected tissue slowly sealing off the victim's windpipe until he suffocates to death.

    NPR Topics: News

  • Hib can also cause severe swelling in the throat due to a condition called epiglottitis, which, if not treated immediately, results in infected tissue slowly sealing off the victim's windpipe until he suffocates to death.

    NPR Topics: News

  • Hib can also cause severe swelling in the throat due to a condition called epiglottitis, which, if not treated immediately, results in infected tissue slowly sealing off the victim’s windpipe until he suffocates to death.

    The Panic Virus

  • Hib can also cause severe swelling in the throat due to a condition called epiglottitis, which, if not treated immediately, results in infected tissue slowly sealing off the victim’s windpipe until he suffocates to death.

    The Panic Virus

  • Hib can also cause severe swelling in the throat due to a condition called epiglottitis, which, if not treated immediately, results in infected tissue slowly sealing off the victim’s windpipe until he suffocates to death.

    The Panic Virus

  • Haemophilus influenzae type b—can cause meningitis, pneumonia, and epiglottitis a severe throat infection that can lead to choking and death.

    You Raising Your Child

  • Haemophilus influenzae type b—can cause meningitis, pneumonia, and epiglottitis a severe throat infection that can lead to choking and death.

    You Raising Your Child

  • Haemophilus influenzae type b—can cause meningitis, pneumonia, and epiglottitis a severe throat infection that can lead to choking and death.

    You Raising Your Child

  • Haemophilus influenzae type b—can cause meningitis, pneumonia, and epiglottitis a severe throat infection that can lead to choking and death.

    You Raising Your Child

Comments

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  • this is what George Washington died of. Also known as (at the time) quinsy.

    April 14, 2008

  • Quinsy sounds ever so much more romantic. ;-)

    April 14, 2008

  • Since when was romanticising imflammation of the dangly bit at the back of your throat causing a subsequent choking death a good thing?

    April 14, 2008

  • Who said it was a good thing?

    April 14, 2008

  • I think "quinsy" is kind of a quaint-sounding term; it doesn't sound like what it means. But I don't think the epiglottis is the dangly bit at the back of your throat--the dangly bit is the uvula. Isn't it?

    April 14, 2008

  • Say Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa

    April 14, 2008

  • I've always thought that quinsy was tonsillitis. But maybe it was just used as a general term for inflammation of the throat.

    Quinsy might sound quaint. But then so do palsy and dropsy, both of which are actually fairly serious ailments.

    The other 'ending in sy' diseases, pleurisy and ablepsy, do have a more obviously medical sound to them.

    April 14, 2008

  • Yes, they are very serious. It's strange to me they have such cute-sounding names. In fact a relative of someone I work with was just taken to the E.R. with pleurisy the other day.

    Quinsy could well be tonsillitis, in the past sense of the term. I think medical terms in historical periods were far more vague, to us, than we think of medical terms being today. Quinsy probably encompassed "really sore throat," which could mean tonsillitis or epiglottitis, or even other conditions with similar symptoms.

    These all definitely sound more serious than the marthambles or catarrh though.

    p.s. sionnach, what's ablepsy? I'm lost without WeirdNet.

    April 14, 2008

  • To me, catarrh just sounds like a really, really warped guitar.

    April 14, 2008

  • Cerebral palsy. I think there are other palsies too.

    April 15, 2008