Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Having equal potential.
  • adj. Physics Having the same electric potential at every point.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Having equal potential.
  • n. A region whose every point has the same potential.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Having the same potential.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • In physics, connected with a single value of the potential. See potential.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Remember how Driesch and his supporters fought for recognition that life transcends physics and chemistry, by arguing that the powers of regeneration in the sea urchin embryo were not explicable by a machinelike structure, and how the controversy has continued, along similar lines, between those who insisted that regulative “equipotential” or “organismic” integration was irreducible to any machinelike mechanism and was therefore irreducible also to the laws of inanimate nature.

    Polanyi: morphogenetic field

  • In the case of a uniformly conducting soil, the current disperses radially, generating circular equipotential lines.

    1. Swer, a low cost rural distribution system using single wire earth return.

  • The results were shown in such terms as diagrams and equations of equipotential surfaces, familiar to a space captain.

    The Earth Book of Stormgate

  • Any equipotential surface which represents a particular aetherial density, would also correspond with a particular elasticity or pressure of the Aether, while it would further correspond with a particular temperature, if such a term is applicable to the Aether.

    Aether and Gravitation

  • _ -- The fact that in an electric field there are different points at different potentials, leads us to the truth that in an electric field there are also equipotential surfaces; that is to say, there are surfaces where the electric density or the aetherial density are equal at all points on such a surface.

    Aether and Gravitation

  • In Fig. 11 the sections of the equipotential surfaces would be vertical, while in Fig. 10 the sections of the equipotential surfaces would be horizontal, while the electric lines of force would be radial, as all electric radiations take place in straight lines, as we shall see was proved by Hertz, later on.

    Aether and Gravitation

  • This agrees with Art. 77, in which we saw that the pressure around any body due to aetherial density also possessed equipotential surfaces.

    Aether and Gravitation

  • These aetherial lines of force stretch out into space on every side of the sun, and in fact form concentric magnetic shells around the sun; which magnetic shells coincide with the equipotential surfaces of the

    Aether and Gravitation

  • So that if one body _A_ acts upon another body _B_, it acts upon _B_ solely and entirely by the action of the atoms which form the magnetic lines of force, and the equipotential surfaces around the electrified body, and that action can be traced mentally step by step across the intervening space that may exist between the two bodies.

    Aether and Gravitation

  • Let _S_ represent the sun, and the circle round it represent the equipotential spheres which exist round the sun.

    Aether and Gravitation

Comments

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  • a region in space where every point in it is at the same voltage or potential

    April 19, 2008