Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun An authoritative recognition or authentication, as of a document or a right; an official warrant or permission.
  • noun The right asserted by secular rulers and by bishops to exclude from their territory or dioceses any papal bulls which they consider injurious.
  • noun A written recognition of a person in the character of consul or commercial agent issued by the government to which he is accredited, and authorizing him to exercise his powers.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun A written official recognition of a consul or commercial agent, issued by the government to which he is accredited, and authorizing him to exercise his powers in the place to which he is assigned.
  • noun Official recognition or permission.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun An official authorization given by a government to a consul etc.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Latin exequātur.

Examples

  • (Please not the exequatur is a French ordnance by which the courts gives a decision by a third party or an umpire executory force.

    The Modern Regime, Volume 2

  • Three days later the British diplomat was notified that the exequatur of Moore had been revoked by the President and that henceforth all intercourse was prohibited between the people of Newport and the Africa.

    Washington

  • Three days later the British diplomat was notified that the exequatur of Moore had been revoked by the President and that henceforth all intercourse was prohibited between the people of Newport and the Africa.

    Washington

  • Three days later the British diplomat was notified that the exequatur of Moore had been revoked by the President and that henceforth all intercourse was prohibited between the people of Newport and the Africa.

    Washington

  • Three days later the British diplomat was notified that the exequatur of Moore had been revoked by the President and that henceforth all intercourse was prohibited between the people of Newport and the Africa.

    Washington

  • Lyons believed that Seward would not go further than to withdraw Bunch's exequatur, but he was anxious for the return of Mercier (long absent with Prince Napoleon), since "our position is unluckily not exactly the same with that of France [374]."

    Great Britain and the American Civil War

  • This was the recall by Seward of the exequatur of the British consul Bunch, at Charleston, South Carolina.

    Great Britain and the American Civil War

  • October 26, Seward read to Lyons the instruction to Adams on the revocation of Bunch's exequatur.

    Great Britain and the American Civil War

  • From Rome he proceeded to Washington, and, with the United States _exequatur_, he entered Manila on November 18, 1902, and died there on June 26,

    The Philippine Islands

  • Each priest who had yielded to the legate's authority without previously taking cognisance of the _regium exequatur_ was ordered to pay P1,000 fine.

    The Philippine Islands

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