Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • Archaic Fairy.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Obsolete spelling of fairy.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a small being, human in form, playful and having magical powers
  • noun the enchanted realm of fairies

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • In CATNYP by Delia Sherman, a mortal girl who is a "taken child" tries to find her place in faery society, where she is without any special powers.

    The Faery Reel

  • Another query about fairies, spelled as "faery" this time.

    Inside the Mailbag, Week #4

  • Another query about fairies, spelled as "faery" this time.

    Archive 2008-05-01

  • It need not just be saltwater habitats either: many of the Celtic "faery" tales link the Fair Folk with lakes and lochs.

    Posthuman Blues

  • "faery," though the land poor Angela had wandered away from was the

    The Master-Christian

  • A disappeared world where magic reigned, and Fey and Other passed with ease between the mortal and faery realms.

    Earl of Durkness

  • The weaver rendering the Fey aura—for even without the recognizable dolmen behind her it was obvious the woman was one of the faery folk—worked in a mix of gold and silver threads.

    Earl of Durkness

  • During the Lost Days, the walls between the faery kingdom of Ynys Avalenn and the mortal realm remained open with both sides able to pass as needed.

    Earl of Durkness

  • The weaver rendering the Fey aura—for even without the recognizable dolmen behind her it was obvious the woman was one of the faery folk—worked in a mix of gold and silver threads.

    Earl of Durkness

  • During the Lost Days, the walls between the faery kingdom of Ynys Avalenn and the mortal realm remained open with both sides able to pass as needed.

    Earl of Durkness

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