Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To cause to endure severe hunger.
  • transitive v. To cause to starve to death.
  • intransitive v. To endure severe deprivation, especially of food.
  • intransitive v. To undergo starvation and die.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To starve (to death); to kill or destroy with hunger.
  • v. To exhaust the strength or endurance of, by hunger; to distress with hunger.
  • v. To kill, or to cause to suffer extremity, by deprivation or denial of anything necessary.
  • v. To force or constrain by famine.
  • v. To die of hunger; to starve.
  • v. To suffer extreme hunger or thirst, so as to be exhausted in strength, or to come near to perish.
  • v. To suffer extremity from deprivation of anything essential or necessary.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To starve, kill, or destroy with hunger.
  • transitive v. To exhaust the strength or endurance of, by hunger; to distress with hanger.
  • transitive v. To kill, or to cause to suffer extremity, by deprivation or denial of anything necessary.
  • transitive v. To force or constrain by famine.
  • intransitive v. To die of hunger; to starve.
  • intransitive v. To suffer extreme hunger or thirst, so as to be exhausted in strength, or to come near to perish.
  • intransitive v. To suffer extremity from deprivation of anything essential or necessary.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To deprive of nourishment; keep or cause to be insufficiently supplied with food or drink; starve; destroy, exhaust, or distress with hunger or thirst.
  • To suffer extreme hunger or thirst; be exhausted through want of food or drink; suffer extremity by deprivation of any necessary.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. die of food deprivation
  • v. deprive of food
  • v. be hungry; go without food

Etymologies

Middle English famishen, alteration of famen, from Old French afamer, from Vulgar Latin *affamāre : Latin ad-, ad- + Latin famēs, hunger.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
An alteration of fame ("starve"), after verbs in -ish. Compare famine, affamish. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • In the first scene, the First Citizen describes the Senate the 1% of ancient Rome: They ne'er cared for us yet: suffer us to famish, and their storehouses crammed with grain; make edicts for usury, to support usurers; repeal daily any wholesome act established against the rich, and provide more piercing statutes daily to chain up and restrain the poor.

    What Shakespeare Thought About the 1%

  • But, til then, here he will stay, and neither quit the spot whence he sends you these lines, till you have deigned to pronounce verbally his doom, though he should famish for want of food!

    Camilla

  • March 16, 2008 at 4:36 pm iz u teh famish “magnificat n D”?

    Ninja - Lolcats 'n' Funny Pictures of Cats - I Can Has Cheezburger?

  • For since thy good works, not thy goods will follow thee; since riches are an appurtenance of life, and no dead man is rich, to famish in plenty, and live poorly to die rich, were

    Letter to a Friend

  • Lazarus lies howling at his gates for a few crumbs, he only seeks chippings, offals; let him roar and howl, famish, and eat his own flesh, he respects him not.

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  • The LORD will be terrible unto them: for he will famish all the gods of the earth; and men shall worship him, every one from his place, even all the isles of the heathen.

    Probably Just One Of Those Funny Coincidences

  • You are all resolved rather to die than to famish?

    The Tragedy of Coriolanus

  • Fie on ambition! fie on myself, that have a sword, and yet am ready to famish!

    The Second part of King Henry the Sixth

  • He welcomed me, on the contrary, with a joy that was evidently to a certain extent artificial and dictated by politeness, but was also sincere, prompted both by his stomach which so long a delay had begun to famish, and his consciousness of

    The Guermantes Way

  • The Buckabank chaps are reet famish sweet hearters,

    The Bleckell Murrymeet (Merry Night)

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.