Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • Air; atmosphere: aeroballistics.
  • Gas: aerosol.
  • Aviation: aeronautics.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Greek āero-, from āēr, air; see wer-1 in Indo-European roots.

Examples

  • Lindsay died far more famous-or infamous'than she had ever been in life, a fact that undoubtedly would have roused little in her except cynical amusement.

    Hunting Fear

  • While reason asserted that naturally the famous-or about-to-be-famous, or possibly-famous, at any rate-were bound to be much like everyone else in their daily behavior, I had to admit that I found this report of the Bonnie Prince a bit of a letdown.

    Dragonfly in Amber

  • At ten minutes to twelve, they drove off in the car to the famous-or infamous-Ace of Spades.

    Partners In Crime

  • Dunross had chosen the foyer deliberately, wanting to be seen with the now famous-or infamous Bartlett and his lady.

    Noble House

  • Out of all the performance art that grew out of S. F.'s punk scene, perhaps none was so famous-or infamous-as S.rvival Research Labs, Mark Pauline

    SF360

  • We are, after all, talking about a singular vision of the future that's most famous-or infamous-for featuring Sean Connery wearing a large red diaper.

    News

  • Structure and Randomness, collects some of the writings that first appeared there: expository notes on mathematical results that are or ought to be well-known, sketches of unusual proofs for classical theorems, the texts of three invited lectures, a selection of discussions of open problems, and a few curiosities, including a famous-or infamous-attempt to explain quantum mechanics in terms of the video game

    American Scientist Online

  • He vowed to make the names of such earmark gluttons famous-or infamous, as the case may be.

    WORLDMag.com

Comments

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  • the word famous-or looks funny, because there are two words, which is unusual. What do you know!

    October 27, 2009