Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun Any of various perennial grasses of the genus Festuca, often cultivated as pasturage.
  • noun Any of several annual grasses of the genus Vulpia of dry habitats.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A straw, wire, pin, or slender stick used to point out the letters to children when learning to read. See first extract under ferular.
  • noun A plectrum with which a lyre or dulcimer is played.
  • noun The style or straight rod by which the shadow is cast in sun-dials of certain forms, as in those set upon upright walls. See sun-dial.
  • noun Fescue-grass. See Festuca.
  • To use a fescue in teaching pupils to read.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • verb To use a fescue, or teach with a fescue.
  • noun A straw, wire, stick, etc., used chiefly to point out letters to children when learning to read.
  • noun obsolete An instrument for playing on the harp; a plectrum.
  • noun obsolete The style of a dial.
  • noun (Bot.) A grass of the genus Festuca.
  • noun (Bot.) a genus of grasses (Festuca) containing several species of importance in agriculture. Festuca ovina is sheep's fescue; F. elatior is meadow fescue.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A straw, wire, stick, etc., used chiefly to point out letters to children when learning to read.
  • noun A hardy grass commonly used to border golf fairways in temperate climates. Any member of the genus Festuca.
  • verb To use a fescue, or teach with a fescue.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun grass with wide flat leaves cultivated in Europe and America for permanent pasture and hay and for lawns

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Alteration of Middle English festu, straw, from Old French, from Late Latin festūcum, from Latin festūca.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Old French festu (modern fétu), from Proto-Romance festu, from Latin festuca ‘stalk, stem, straw’.

Examples

Comments

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  • The style of a dial. --Century Dictionary

    September 28, 2011

  • "John and his mother swished through carpets of vetches and fescues or pushed their way through the bushes, splashing through springs that broke through the turf and flowed through the grass in secret cascades."

    John Saturnall's Feast by Lawrence Norfolk, p 42

    November 10, 2012