Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun One who flutters; one who causes something to flutter.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun One who, or that which, flutters.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Agent noun of flutter; one who flutters.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Why he called her his flutterer no one ever knew, unless it was because her ribbons were incessantly fluttering; but, had he called her his shadow, the name would have been more appropriate.

    Madame Midas

  • You see -- poor, giddy flutterer -- he did not like to hear the plain truth spoken; flattery would have pleased him better, yet truth, though sometimes bitter, is a wholesome tonic when taken properly.

    Parables from Flowers

  • The one marked with a cross is drawn by the flutterer and means that he is for it.

    Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 158, 1920-02-11

  • The pigeons flew toward the flutterer, made a swirl in the air, and began to light on the pigeon pole.

    Ben Comee A Tale of Rogers's Rangers, 1758-59

  • Philosophy there is, and very good philosophy too, from the flutterer and fritter, and such love-making as every virtuous woman (at heart a minx) allows.

    Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 158, 1920-02-11

  • If not, it meant that she was out of the chrysalis and had become, not the busy bee that belongs to the mesquite and the sage, but a gaudier, less responsible flutterer among eastern flower-beds.

    Rimrock Trail

  • "Don't get alarmed, don't get peevish, don't get panicky, don't be a wicked old flutterer, Ham, my boy!" he said.

    Bones in London

  • It was only the lightest touch; and instantly, suddenly, as if startled by the chill contact, the azure flutterer rose again.

    Children of the Wild

  • It seemed to catch the eccentric little flutterer fairly.

    Children of the Wild

  • Why he called her his flutterer no one ever knew, unless it was because her ribbons were incessantly fluttering; but, had he called her his shadow, the name would have been more appropriate.

    Madame Midas

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