Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The practice of illustrating a particular book by engravings collected from other books.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The principles and methods of the grangers of the United States.
  • n. The practice of illustrating a book by binding up in it engravings taken from other books, or with independent prints, watercolors, etc.; also, the resulting mutilation of books.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • I have in mind that kind of writing which resembles grangerism: given an atmosphere of indeterminate 'significance,' the reader cooperates by pasting his own meanings into the vacant spaces provided.

    Kindly Shoot Above the Trees

Comments

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  • "The practice of illustrating a book by binding up in it engravings taken from other books, or with independent prints, watercolors, etc.; also, the resulting mutilation of books. The practice became popular when James Granger published, in 1769, his “Biographical History of England,” which incited persons to mutilate other books to illustrate it."

    - The Century Dictionary

    The full title of Granger's book is: A Biographical History of England, from Egbert the Great to the Revolution: Consisting of Characters diſpoſed in different Classes, and adapted to a Methodical Catalogue of Engraved British Heads. Intended As: An Essay towards reducing our Biography to System, and a Help to the Knowledge of Portraits. Interspersed With: Variety of Anecdotes, and Memoirs of a great Number of Persons, not to be found in any other Biographical Work. With a Preface, ſhewing the Utility of a Collection of Engraved Portraits to ſupply the Defect, and answer the various Purpoſes, of Medals. By the Rev. J. Granger, Vicar of Shiplake, in Oxfordſhire.

    See grangerize.

    July 19, 2010