Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In Greek antiquity, a covered wagon, much used by women, which is mentioned by Herodotus and Xenophon in descriptions of Persian luxury. It was similar to the apena (which see).

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The first carriage was a so-called harmamaxa, drawn by four horses decked out with bells and tassels; a two-wheeled cart followed, and last in the train was a baggage-wagon drawn by mules.

    An Egyptian Princess — Volume 07

  • The closed 'harmamaxa' in which he came bore him from our house directly to the vessel which was to convey him to

    Cleopatra — Volume 02

  • The closed 'harmamaxa' in which he came bore him from our house directly to the vessel which was to convey him to Cyprus and Rome.

    Cleopatra — Complete

  • Porphyrius himself ordered his closed harmamaxa to be brought out, and undertook to fetch weapons and standards to the temple from a storehouse where they were laid by.

    Serapis — Volume 03

  • After this he knew nothing more, except that he had rushed with the rest upon a large harmamaxa, -- [A closed Asiatic travelling-carriage with four wheels] -- and in so doing fell.

    Cleopatra — Volume 04

  • Archias's closed harmamaxa, which was waiting outside the building.

    Arachne — Volume 07

  • Hermon again landed and ordered that his uncle's harmamaxa should convey him to the necropolis.

    Arachne — Volume 07

  • You, my young friend, go now and order away the imperial litter; bid my steward to have the horses put to my covered harmamaxa.

    A Thorny Path — Volume 09

  • Three days later Gaumata himself, with his head bound up, was driven out in a closed harmamaxa.

    An Egyptian Princess — Volume 08

  • The strangest thing to foreign eyes was a stately though undecorated harmamaxa, out of which stepped first a handsome wreathed youth, then a matron of middle age, and at last an elegantly dressed girl, whose rare beauty made even Martialis -- who rarely noticed women -- exclaim, "Now, she is to my taste the sweetest-thing of all."

    A Thorny Path — Volume 09

Comments

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  • Which didn't see :-/

    May 29, 2018

  • Ha--not sure how I missed it. Thank you, bilby!

    May 29, 2018

  • A which see!

    May 27, 2018

  • "In Greek antiquity, a covered wagon, much used by women, which is mentioned by Herodotus and Xenophon in descriptions of Persian luxury. It was similar to the apena (which see)."

    - Century Dictionary

    August 20, 2010