Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A long tunic made of chain mail.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A coat of mail; especially, the long coat of mail of the European Middle Ages, as contrasted with the habergeon, which is shorter and sometimes sleeveless.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A coat of mail; especially, the long coat of mail of the European Middle Ages, as contrasted with the habergeon, which is shorter and sometimes sleeveless. By old writers it is often used synonymously with habergeon. See habergeon.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A part of mail armor intended originally for the protection of the neck and shoulders, but as generally used a long coat of mail coming below the knees and even nearly to the ankles, slit up the sides, and sometimes in front and behind, to allow the wearer to mount a horse.
  • n. In the fourteenth century and later, a piece of defensive armor, probably an outer garment of splint armor. See splint, jesserant, and crevisse.
  • n. Among actors, a short tunic forming a part of medieval dress.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a long (usually sleeveless) tunic of chain mail formerly worn as defensive armor

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Middle English, from Old French hauberc, of Germanic origin; see kwel-1 in Indo-European roots.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Old French hauberc, of Germanic origin, perhaps Frankish.

Examples

  • Albright borrowed some new equipment from the local blacksmith – no full plate, unfortunately, but an adequate shield and chain hauberk for him, and a crossbow, light sword, and hauberk for Nora.

    The Kurse of Kain « A Fly in Amber

  • These days I will more often call a hauberk a mail shirt or a gambeson a quilted tunic.

    Archaic terminology in historical fiction

  • Mail armor, of which the hauberk is a species, and which derived its name from maille, a French word for MESH, was of two kinds,

    The Age of Fable

  • The hauberk was a complete covering of double chain mail.

    The Age of Fable

  • See Guest, "The Mabinogion".] [Footnote 110: The hauberk was a long shirt of mail reaching to the knees, worn by knights in combat.

    Four Arthurian Romances

  • [Footnote 1: 'Hauberk:' the hauberk was a texture of steel ringlets or rings interwoven, forming a coat of mail that sat close to the body, and adapted itself to every motion.] [Footnote 2: 'Stout Glo'ster:' Gilbert de Clare, surnamed the Red,

    Poetical Works of Johnson, Parnell, Gray, and Smollett With Memoirs, Critical Dissertations, and Explanatory Notes

  • In their allowed pleasures and pastimes, let them wear that spiritual hauberk which is invulnerable to the darts of the wicked; let them steadfastly set their faces against whatever thy word disallows; and, should fiery trial and temptation beset them, enable them, having done all, to stand. "

    Jacques Bonneval

  • And a figure in steel helmet and leather hauberk—faceless behind a bent nose guard, ageless within the armor of war—had delivered the death blow.

    Earl of Durkness

  • Sir Albright the Black, new mayor of the town of Glen, grunted and swore as he tried to remove his mail hauberk.

    The Kurse of Kain « A Fly in Amber

  • That last part stuck out now, ugly and lethal as a flapping rent in a chain-mail hauberk.

    THE RIVER KINGS’ ROAD

Comments

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  • "And then they let their horses run as fast as they might, so that the other knight smote Sir Melias through hauberk and through the left side, that he fell to the earth nigh dead."

    - Thomas Malory, 'The Holy Grail'.

    September 8, 2009

  • A shorter variant of this object, with short sleeves, is called a haubergeon.

    November 8, 2007