Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of humanist.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • (That I now work for, in the persons of Prometheus Books, the one group of anti-Xtians that actively does self-identify as secular humanists is the height of irony and/or the evidence of karma).

    A Climate of Opinion

  • The humanists, in other words, did more than anyone else to invent the Rinascimento, the Renaissance.

    Delizia!

  • Buddhism of which so much has been made by Western humanists is a creature of their highly selective readings of Buddhist scripture.

    Letters to the Editor

  • This system is now entirely controlling human lives and destinies, asserving us to its own benefits, not (any more) ours which remain humanists utopias.

    More than a tragedy — a scandal « BuzzMachine

  • A sampling of comments from our readers: The humanists are the new clergy ...

    RELIGION Blog | dallasnews.com

  • Liberal humanists, which is what the BBC is made up of these days, along with more than the average alcoholics, homosexuals and ethnic minorities, cannot allow Islam to be demonised because their own agenda would suffer a fatal body blow.

    Just what is the BBC on ?

  • “A cabal of secularists, so-called humanists, trial lawyers, cultural relativists, and liberal, guilt-wracked Christians — not just Jewish people.”

    waterdiluted Diary Entry

  • According to the book “Doubt” by Jennifer Michael Hecht, there was a substantial community of atheists, doubters and what we might call humanists in the golden age of Islam.

    Disingenuous Institute - The Panda's Thumb

  • I think that many of our so-called humanists, professors of English or philosophy and so forth today, are anything but humanists.

    Tenured Radicals

  • Quite naturally this figure which to the humanists was the flattering symbol of eloquence, also serves as an emblem to the French Kings: we meet it again in the decorations designed by Jean Goujon in 1549 for the stately entry of Henri II in Paris.

    Dictionary of the History of Ideas

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