Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • adjective Having an affinity for water; readily absorbing or dissolving in water.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Same as hydrophil.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective physics, chemistry having an affinity for water; able to absorb, or be wetted by water

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adjective having a strong affinity for water; tending to dissolve in, mix with, or be wetted by water

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • That's because when the titanium oxide interacts with sunlight it also creates what is called a hydrophilic surface that allows water to cascade off the panel in sheets rather than bead up.

    Forbes.com: News

  • That's because when the titanium dioxide interacts with sunlight it also creates what is called a hydrophilic surface that allows water to cascade off the panel in sheets rather than bead up.

    msnbc.com: Top msnbc.com headlines

  • Acetate and triacetate have a little absorbency, but much less than fibers classified as hydrophilic.

    HOME COMFORTS

  • Acetate and triacetate have a little absorbency, but much less than fibers classified as hydrophilic.

    HOME COMFORTS

  • Acetate and triacetate have a little absorbency, but much less than fibers classified as hydrophilic.

    HOME COMFORTS

  • Acetate and triacetate have a little absorbency, but much less than fibers classified as hydrophilic.

    HOME COMFORTS

  • Glass is hydrophilic, which is why a thin glass tube will draw water into itself via capillary action.

    Nano Tech Wire

  • On one end of the molecule is hydrophilic, meaning it likes water: it can be dissolved by water.

    A Bit of Soap

  • On one end of the molecule is hydrophilic, meaning it likes water: it can be dissolved by water.

    Archive 2009-06-01

  • A critical feature of micelles is that they combine two types of polymers, one being hydrophobic and the other hydrophilic, meaning they are either unable or able to mix with water.

    D Mag - News

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