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indomitableness

Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Quality of being indomitable.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

indomitable +‎ -ness.

Examples

  • Receiving by heredity the fierce, bull-like nature of his father plus the passive indomitableness and groping spirit of his mother, Fomá, proud and rebellious, is repelled by the selfish, money-seeking environment into which he is born.

    Fomá Gordyéeff

  • The set of his mouth, his chin, his jaw, was likewise firm or harsh, with all the fierceness and indomitableness of the male — the nose also.

    Chapter 10

  • It is a testament to the indomitableness of these two men, if not to the entire human spirit, that Malone and Murdoch are still standing and in relative good humor after their struggles.

    The Best of Enemies

  • Nor, will the tragic dramatist who would depict mortal indomitableness in its fullest sweep and direct swing, ever forget a hint, incidentally so important in his art, as the one now alluded to.

    Moby Dick; or the Whale

  • From its relative situation then, I should call this high hump the organ of firmness or indomitableness in the Sperm Whale.

    Moby Dick; or the Whale

  • It was not so much from feelings of animal vivacity that my difficulty came, as from a sense of the indomitableness of the spirit within me.

    Cosmic Consciousness

  • Struggle is too pale a word for the decades of efforts and obstacles that these courageous Southerners have known, particularly since rice has come to be grown so successfully elsewhere; and when the devoted planter happens to be a woman, the measure of daily indomitableness is full and runs over.

    A Woman Rice Planter

  • Receiving by heredity the fierce, bull-like nature of his father plus the passive indomitableness and groping spirit of his mother,

    Fomá Gordyéeff

  • With an odd sense of detachment, of critical remoteness and contempt she glanced at him as he sat stupidly absorbed in his newspaper, his face puckered, his lips pursed, and Ditmar rose before her -- Ditmar, the embodiment of an indomitableness that refused to be beaten and crushed.

    Project Gutenberg Complete Works of Winston Churchill

  • With an odd sense of detachment, of critical remoteness and contempt she glanced at him as he sat stupidly absorbed in his newspaper, his face puckered, his lips pursed, and Ditmar rose before her -- Ditmar, the embodiment of an indomitableness that refused to be beaten and crushed.

    The Dwelling Place of Light — Complete

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