Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The act of burying in the ground, especially as opposed to incremation; interment.
  • noun In chem., a method, now obsolete, of digesting substances by burying the vessel containing them in warm earth or manure.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun The act of inhuming or burying; interment.
  • noun (Old Chem.) The act of burying vessels in warm earth in order to expose their contents to a steady moderate heat; the state of being thus exposed.
  • noun (Med.) Arenation.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun The act of burial.
  • noun The act of burying vessels in warm earth in order to expose their contents to a steady moderate heat; the state of being thus exposed.
  • noun medicine arenation

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun the ritual placing of a corpse in a grave

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From inhume +‎ -ation

Examples

  • Death isn’t good for profits, you see, and self-inhumation is taken very seriously.

    365 tomorrows » 2007 » May : A New Free Flash Fiction SciFi Story Every Day

  • One of the funerary practices in widespread use by the early English ‘Anglo-Saxons’, before they converted to Christianity, was inhumation burial with grave goods.

    Archive 2010-05-01

  • One of the funerary practices in widespread use by the early English ‘Anglo-Saxons’, before they converted to Christianity, was inhumation burial with grave goods.

    Silk in early England

  • Like the others she had seen, this was no careful inhumation, but the hurried concealment of a crime.

    FALSE MERMAID

  • Like the others she had seen, this was no careful inhumation, but the hurried concealment of a crime.

    FALSE MERMAID

  • Two other inhumation burials, each containing a man buried with weapons and a horse, were excavated at RAF Lakenheath in 1997 and 1999.

    Archive 2008-06-01

  • Two other inhumation burials, each containing a man buried with weapons and a horse, were excavated at RAF Lakenheath in 1997 and 1999.

    Horses in seventh-century England

  • I remember one study from an English inhumation cemetery (I will look up the reference when I have time) reported the average (mean, I think) height of the men at around six feet.

    Horses in seventh-century England

  • The Jewish nation, though they entertained the old way of inhumation, yet sometimes admitted this practice.

    Hydriotaphia, or Urn-burial

  • Many have taken voluminous pains to determine the state of the soul upon disunion; but men have been most phantastical in the singular contrivances of their corporal dissolution: whilst the soberest nations have rested in two ways, of simple inhumation and burning.

    Hydriotaphia, or Urn-burial

Comments

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  • "2. In chem., a method, now obsolete, of digesting substances by burying the vessel containing them in warm earth or manure." --Cent. Dict.

    May 16, 2011