Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A form of injector for impelling air into a furnace.
  • noun A medical instrument for blowing air, or a gas, vapor, or powder, into some opening of the body. See insufflation, 3.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Agent noun of insufflate: a person or device which insufflates.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

to insufflate + -er

Examples

  • His magnifying glass and evidence envelopes went everywhere with him, but the tin box containing powders, brush, and insufflator created unnecessary bulk in the pockets, unless he anticipated needing it.

    Locked Rooms

  • His magnifying glass and evidence envelopes went everywhere with him, but the tin box containing powders, brush, and insufflator created unnecessary bulk in the pockets, unless he anticipated needing it.

    Locked Rooms

  • As to prints, there had at one time been some powder and an insufflator down at the prison, but goodness knew where they were now.

    Tour de Force

  • Connect the straight portion of a ~Y~-shaped piece of tubing to the upper end of the sterilised tube and couple one branch of the ~Y~ to a separatory funnel containing the fluid inoculum, or insufflator containing the powdered inoculum, and the other to a hand bellows.

    The Elements of Bacteriological Technique A Laboratory Guide for Medical, Dental, and Technical Students. Second Edition Rewritten and Enlarged.

  • Bailey was at the piano with an insufflator and a strong lamp.

    Overture to Death

  • He returned with Nigel, produced his insufflator and got to work on the parcel.

    Death in Ecstasy

  • Detective-Sergeant Bailey got to work with an insufflator and white chalk.

    Death in Ecstasy

  • Perhaps after a decent interval I could hint for an invitation to Ancreton and you could come down with your insufflator and black ink.

    Final Curtain

  • He next mounted the footboard, and, having peered in through the window of the sealed compartment, produced from his pocket a small insufflator or powder-blower, with which he blew a stream of impalpable smoke-like powder on to the edges of the middle window, bestowing the closest attention on the irregular dusty patches in which it settled, and even measuring one on the jamb of the window with a pocket-rule.

    John Thorndyke's Cases related by Christopher Jervis and edited by R. Austin Freeman

  • He took from his bag a long, registering chemical thermometer and an insufflator or powder-blower.

    John Thorndyke's Cases related by Christopher Jervis and edited by R. Austin Freeman

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.