Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. See isoline.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A word or phrase in which each letter occurs the same number of times
  • n. A line on a chart, such as a contour line, joining points that have the same value for some quantity

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A diagram exhibiting a family of curves for the purpose of showing a relation between three variables.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a line drawn on a map connecting points having the same numerical value of some variable

Etymologies

Portmanteau of isolated and pangram. (Wiktionary)

Examples

Sorry, no example sentences found.

Comments

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  • David Crystal says that an isogram isn't necessarily a word in which no letter is repeated, but a letter in which the letters have the same frequency. "But to the ludic linguist, Wilmcote is a first-order isogram, or heterogram. Not a very interesting one, admittedly, but a first-order isogram nonetheless.

    An isogram is a word in which the letters turn up an equal number of times. In a first-order isogram, each letter appears just once: dialogue is an example. In a second-order isogram, each letter appears twice: deed is an example. Longer examples are hard to find: they include Vivienne, Caucasus, intestines, and (important for a phonetician to know this) bilabial. In a third-order isogram, each letter appears three times. These are very rare, unusual words such as deeded ('conveyed by deed'), sestettes (a variant spelling of sextets), and geggee ('victim of a hoax)."
    By Hook or By Crook by David Crystal, p 192

    December 20, 2008

  • David Crystal says that an isogram isn't necessarily a word in which no letter is repeated, but a letter in which the letters have the same frequency. "But to the ludic linguist, Wilmcote is a first-order isogram, or heterogram. Not a very interesting one, admittedly, but a first-order isogram nonetheless.

    An isogram is a word in which the letters turn up an equal number of times. In a first-order isogram, each letter appears just once: dialogue is an example. In a second-order isogram, each letter appears twice: deed is an example. Longer examples are hard to find: they include Vivienne, Caucasus, intestines, and (important for a phonetician to know this) bilabial. In a third-order isogram, each letter appears three times. These are very rare, unusual words such as deeded ('conveyed by deed'), sestettes (a variant spelling of sextets, and geggee ('victim of a hoax)."
    By Hook or By Crook by David Crystal, p 192

    December 20, 2008

  • E.g., ambidextrously.

    May 24, 2008

  • A word in which no letter is repeated

    July 25, 2007