Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Wearing a kerchief.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Dressed; hooded; covered; wearing a kerchief.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

kerchief +‎ -ed

Examples

  • If we are fast, my mother and I, we can jump down the three metal steps of the train and check out the local offerings peddled by kerchiefed women: strawberries sold by the cup; jars of home-marinated mushrooms, their slippery caps glistening through glass; and fried pirozhki filled with cabbage, mouth-watering and greasy.

    A Mountain of Crumbs

  • A kerchiefed woman waddles down the two front steps.

    A Mountain of Crumbs

  • The comedian and sitcom star is set to voice Speedy, the fast-moving, red-kerchiefed mouse known for his signature speed-demon battle cry, 'Andale!

    Archive 2010-02-21

  • The only other churchgoers were a few old women, who often turned their kerchiefed heads sideways to peer at the worshiper.

    The Metamorphosis, in The Penal Colony,and Other Stories

  • Weve always lived with bandits, she said, as if she were still in St. Petersburg, walking along one of the canals there, with the gilded onion domes casting their shadow over Nevsky Prospect and trolley wires snapping and sparking and kerchiefed babushki disappearing into the mouth of the metro.

    The Italian Summer

  • It was Ina, the Abyssinian handmaiden, her kerchiefed hand held in alarm before her lips.

    Antiquarian Weird Tales: A DAMSEL WITH A DULCIMER By MALCOLM FERGUSON

  • Yes, of course I am mildly hypnotized into that opinion by the two kerchiefed, red- and blue-costumed young ladies slapping out tortillas by hand and grilling quesadillas around the fire-fueled tortilla oven.

    Archive 2006-04-01

  • The Golka twins, identically kerchiefed, compared cake rouges through the window of Sweda's Drugs.

    Excerpt: The Amateur Marriage by Anne Tyler

  • Of course, when I say this I leave out of the count the bridge over the Guadalquivir at the morning or evening hour when it is covered with brightly caparisoned donkeys, themselves covered with men needing a shave, and gay-kerchiefed women of every age, with boys and dogs underfoot, and pedestrians of every kind, and hucksters selling sea-fruit and land-fruit and whatever else the stranger would rather see than eat.

    Familiar Spanish Travels

  • Then the doors opened and my kerchiefed old-woman self addressed me.

    Wake Up, Sir!

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