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Etymologies

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Examples

  • And then Miss Sally, in spite of her efforts to preserve a gravity befitting the calamity, broke down like the "kerridge" and laughed hysterically.

    A Virginia girl in the Civil War, 1861-1865, by ed.

  • "kerridge," -- not using that term, as liberal shepherds do, for any battered old shabby-genteel go-cart which has more than one wheel, but meaning thereby a four-wheeled vehicle WITH A POLE, -- my man

    Autocrat of the Breakfast Table

  • "kerridge," -- not using that term, as liberal shepherds do, for any battered old shabby-genteel go-cart which has more than one wheel, but meaning thereby a four-wheeled vehicle WITH A POLE, -- my man

    Complete Project Gutenberg Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. Works

  • "Don't yer see his kerridge is avaitin 'to take him to the Hopera?"

    For the term of his natural life

  • But nut content with thet, they took a kerridge from the fence

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 09, No. 51, January, 1862

  • "We doesn't ingen'ally put blinders on de saddle hawses, Miss, but ef yer says so I'll tak 'em long back ter de stables an 'change de saddle headstalls fer de _kerridge_ ones, tho' it sure would look mighty cur'ous."

    A Dixie School Girl

  • It was "bad enough to be kept waiting outside the station, while your master stood talking to a little feller as looked as like a rag and bone man as anythink; but when you was required to stop the kerridge and pick up every tramp as you overtook on the road, it was coming it a little too strong."

    The Golden Shoemaker or 'Cobbler' Horn

  • Billy said he reckoned Satan had "jined de club"; and late one night, when he had not come in, Uncle Billy told Uncle Carey that it was "powerful slippery and he reckoned they'd better send de kerridge after him" -- an innocent remark that made Uncle Carey send

    Short Stories for English Courses

  • What them kerridge fellows needs is a bash or two in the jaw from the horny hand of toil.

    St. Cuthbert's

  • The 'Bus is the poor body's kerridge, young feller -- and as for your talk

    Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 100, June 20, 1891

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