Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Cargo or equipment thrown into the sea but attached to a float or buoy so that it can be recovered.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Goods or materials found or left on the sea floor.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • See ligan.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. See ligan.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. goods (or wreckage) on the sea bed that is attached to a buoy so that it can be recovered

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

French, from Old French, possibly from Old Norse lögn, lagn-.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Old French lagan, lagand, perhaps of Scandinavian origin.

Examples

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • Confession: I once carried the bags of VM&TC, when I was working as a porter at a 5-star hotel. Paddy Moloney was very reluctant to let the instruments out of his sight. Especially the Uilleann pipes.

    February 15, 2016

  • And it made me think of Van Morrison and The Chieftans.

    June 15, 2011

  • Instantly makes me think of Kate Bush's "My Lagan Love".

    June 15, 2011

  • This brings back memories of my mother singing "My Lagan Love". You Tube version (not by sionnach's mother, but worthy of your consideration, nonetheless) .

    June 13, 2011

  • I'm fondly reminded of a lovely melody and song recorded by Ossian many years ago.

    The Road to Drumleman

    Oh the springtime returns to the Lagan again;

    And the lark sweetly sings o'er the green fertile plain;

    And I'll tak' the road that is dearest to me --

    The road to Drumleman that winds tae the sea.

    For I've made many friends there on every green mile,

    And the folk always greet me with a wave and a smile.

    If I spent all my days here it's happy I'd be,

    On the road to Drumleman that winds to the sea.

    For we sat roon the fireside when the winter winds blew;

    And we laughed and we sang till the night was weel through;

    Then we had a good dram and a wee cup o' tea

    For the road to Drumleman that winds to the sea.

    And the lang summer days when we tramped the hills o'er

    Or spent hours at the Eenans o' Creggans wild shore

    And the soft summer twilight made shadows to flee

    From the road to Drumleman that winds to tae the sea.

    Oh these days passing swiftly bring changes I know

    And as time marches on from this place I must go

    But I'll always remember while the heart beats in me

    The road to Drumleman that winds tae the sea.

    June 13, 2011