Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A soft, silvery, highly reactive element that is an alkali metal and is used as a heat transfer medium, in thermonuclear weapons, and in batteries, lubricants, various alloys, ceramics, and optical glass. Atomic number 3; atomic weight 6.941; melting point 180.5°C; boiling point 1,342°C; specific gravity 0.534; valence 1. cross-reference: Periodic Table.
  • noun Any of several salts of lithium, especially lithium carbonate.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Chemical symbol, Li or L; atomic weight, A metallic element having a silver-white luster, quickly tarnishing in the air.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Chem.) A metallic element of the alkaline group, occurring in several minerals, as petalite, spodumene, lepidolite, triphylite, etc., and otherwise widely disseminated, though in small quantities.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun uncountable The simplest alkali metal, the lightest solid element, and the third lightest chemical element (symbol Li) with an atomic number of 3.
  • noun pharmacology, uncountable Lithium carbonate or other preparations of lithium metal used to treat manic depression and bipolar disorders.
  • noun A lithium battery.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a soft silver-white univalent element of the alkali metal group; the lightest metal known; occurs in several minerals

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[From lithia.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From New Latin lithium, from lithia (in reference to Ancient Greek λίθος (lithos, "stone")) + -ium.

Examples

  • The name lithium comes from the Greek word lithos which means stone because lithium was first discovered in rocks and the other two alkali metals were first discovered in plants.

    Lithium

  • Daimler has been investing heavily in lithium ion batteries, which appears to be the fuel cell of industry consensus, and it also has entered into an alliance with France's Renault and Japan's Nissan that could see the automakers share technology for electric cars and batteries.

    Conventional Engines Prevail At Paris Show

  • When lithium is exposed to the air it could start a fire.

    Top 10 Battery Hacks, Tips, And Tricks | Lifehacker Australia

  • He said Nissan boasts 18 years of development experience in lithium-ion batteries, which will power the Leaf, and the company developed its first electric vehicle in 1947.

    Nissan Shows Tiny Electric Concept Vehicle (VIDEO)

  • U.S. regulators are devising various ways to crack down on air-cargo shipments of computers, cellphones and other electronic devices that contain lithium ion batteries, despite stiff opposition from some of the biggest makers of those products.

    Plane Fires Prompt Battery Safeguards

  • He said Nissan boasts 18 years of development experience in lithium-ion batteries, which will power the Leaf, and the company developed its first electric vehicle in 1947.

    Nissan Shows Tiny Electric Concept Vehicle (VIDEO)

  • He said Nissan boasts 18 years of development experience in lithium-ion batteries, which will power the Leaf, and the company developed its first electric vehicle in 1947.

    Nissan Shows Tiny Electric Concept Vehicle (VIDEO)

  • By combining Hitachi 's technological expertise in lithium-ion batteries with Johnson Control' s strong auto maker client-base and mass production infrastructure, the partnership will benefit both firms, a Hitachi spokeswoman said.

    Hitachi, Johnson Controls in Lithium-Ion Battery Tie-Up

  • He said Nissan boasts 18 years of development experience in lithium-ion batteries, which will power the Leaf, and the company developed its first electric vehicle in 1947.

    Nissan Shows Tiny Electric Concept Vehicle (VIDEO)

  • Hundreds of active pharmaceutical ingredients are used in a variety of manufacturing, including drugmaking: For example, lithium is used to make ceramics and treat bipolar disorder; nitroglycerin is a heart drug and also used in explosives; copper shows up in everything from pipes to contraceptives.

    The New Yorker on the underground world of “neuroenhancing” drugs. - Boing Boing

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  • Li.

    December 16, 2007