Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Any of numerous plants of the genus Lupinus in the pea family, having palmately compound leaves and variously colored flowers grouped in spikes or racemes.
  • adj. Characteristic of or resembling a wolf.
  • adj. Rapacious; ravenous.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Of, or pertaining to, the wolf.
  • adj. Wolflike; wolfish.
  • adj. Having the characteristics of a wolf.
  • adj. Ravenous.
  • n. Any leguminous plant of the genus Lupinus, some poisonous.
  • n. An edible lupine seed.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A leguminous plant of the genus Lupinus, especially Lupinus albus, the seeds of which have been used for food from ancient times. The common species of the Eastern United States is Lupinus perennis. There are many species in California.
  • adj. Wolfish; ravenous.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Like a wolf; wolfish; ravenous.
  • In zoology, pertaining to the series or group of canine animals which contains the wolves, jackals, and dogs, as distinguished from the foxes; thoöid.
  • n. A plant of the genus Lupinus.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. of or relating to or characteristic of wolves
  • n. any plant of the genus Lupinus; bearing erect spikes of usually purplish-blue flowers

Etymologies

Middle English, from Old French lupin, from Latin lupīnum, from neuter of lupīnus, wolflike; see lupine2.
French, from Latin lupīnus, from lupus, wolf; see wl̥kwo- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Latin lupīnus, from lupus ("wolf"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

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  • The lupine force their prey supine.

    July 13, 2010

  • Flower; wolf-like.

    November 22, 2007

  • I have even used this word in scrabble

    December 9, 2006