Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A maker of or dealer in malt. Rarely also malter.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun A maltman.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A person who makes malt; a malter.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a maker of malt

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Derived from malt +‎ -ster.

Examples

  • On the local requirements Mr. Foster the maltster was a very Baedeker.

    Quisanté

  • Lanarkshire, where he conducted the business of a "maltster," or grain merchant.

    The Grand Old Man

  • By the Restoration, it was owned by George Radford, a Derby maltster, in whose family it continued until sold to Derby Corporation in about 1920 by Edwin Radford, who had removed to Haynford Lodge, Norfolk, in the 1890s.

    Archive 2007-11-01

  • By the Restoration, it was owned by George Radford, a Derby maltster, in whose family it continued until sold to Derby Corporation in about 1920 by Edwin Radford, who had removed to Haynford Lodge, Norfolk, in the 1890s.

    Demolition could uncover deserted medieval village

  • Kilning Once the barley reaches the desired balance of enzymes and sugars, the maltster fixes that balance by drying and heating it in a kiln.

    On Food and Cooking, The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

  • If the maltster is going to make a pale malt, then he keeps starch digestion to a minimum and malts for a shorter time; for a darker malt that will benefit from more sugars for the browning reactions, he malts for a longer time, and may finish by holding the moist barley at 140–180°F/60–80°C to maximize the action of the starch-digesting, sugar-producing enzymes.

    On Food and Cooking, The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

  • If the maltster is going to make a pale malt, then he keeps starch digestion to a minimum and malts for a shorter time; for a darker malt that will benefit from more sugars for the browning reactions, he malts for a longer time, and may finish by holding the moist barley at 140–180°F/60–80°C to maximize the action of the starch-digesting, sugar-producing enzymes.

    On Food and Cooking, The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

  • To make malts with high enzyme activities, the maltster dries the barley gently, over about 24 hours, and brings the temperature slowly up to around 180°F/80°C.

    On Food and Cooking, The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

  • To make malts with high enzyme activities, the maltster dries the barley gently, over about 24 hours, and brings the temperature slowly up to around 180°F/80°C.

    On Food and Cooking, The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

  • By 1750, the greater control that coke and coal heat gave the maltster made gently dried pale malts possible, and thereby pale ales.

    On Food and Cooking, The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

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