Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun In heraldry, the young wild boar, used as a bearing.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Her.) A young wild boar.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A young wild boar.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From French marcassin.

Examples

  • This word she imagined must signify something particularly wonderful, since her eyes were compared to it; and being desirous, some time afterwards, to know all the energy of the expression, she asked the meaning of the French word marcassin.

    Court Memoirs of France Series — Complete

  • This word she imagined must signify something particularly wonderful, since her eyes were compared to it; and being desirous, some time afterwards, to know all the energy of the expression, she asked the meaning of the French word marcassin.

    The Memoirs of Count Grammont — Complete

  • This word she imagined must signify something particularly wonderful, since her eyes were compared to it; and being desirous, some time afterwards, to know all the energy of the expression, she asked the meaning of the French word marcassin.

    The Memoirs of Count Grammont — Volume 05

  • The French called them "marcassin," that is, wild boar's eyes.

    Dorothy Vernon of Haddon Hall

  • It is also one of the very finest things to eat in the world and as “sanglier” and “marcassin,” the latter young boar, is one of the reasons that make Dijon the place that all good eaters hope to go when they die.

    Hemingway on Hunting

  • It is also one of the very finest things to eat in the world and as “sanglier” and “marcassin,” the latter young boar, is one of the reasons that make Dijon the place that all good eaters hope to go when they die.

    Hemingway on Hunting

  • It is also one of the very finest things to eat in the world and as “sanglier” and “marcassin,” the latter young boar, is one of the reasons that make Dijon the place that all good eaters hope to go when they die.

    Hemingway on Hunting

  • In the first row those killed by the king himself were ranged; and he numbered forty-six roe-bucks, and one _marcassin_

    The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction Volume 13, No. 354, January 31, 1829

  • I was rather taken aback, particularly when the master of the house told me not to be afraid, it was only a marcassin (small wild boar), who had been born on the place, and was as quiet as a kitten.

    Chateau and Country Life in France

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • Here piggy piggy.

    December 11, 2012

  • The hunter’s a kind of assassin

    Whose keen eye will fatally fasten

    On sanglier young

    Who, killed, are then flung

    In pots for a meal of marcassin.

    October 25, 2017