Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A covering for the hand that encases the thumb separately and the four fingers together.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A glove; a covering for the hand, with or without fingers.
  • noun A covering for the hand, differing from a glove in not having a separate cover for each finger, the thumb only being separated, made of leather, dogskin, sealskin, etc., or knitted of thick wool.
  • noun A mitt.
  • To put mittens on.
  • To give the mitten to. See phrase under mitten, n.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun A covering for the hand, worn to defend it from cold or injury. It differs from a glove in not having a separate sheath for each finger.
  • noun A cover for the wrist and forearm.
  • noun [Colloq.] to dismiss as a lover; to reject the suit of.
  • noun [Colloq.] to treat roughly; to handle without gloves.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A type of glove or garment that covers a hand with a separate sheath for the thumb, but not for other fingers.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun glove that encases the thumb separately and the other four fingers together

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English, from Old French mitaine (from mite, cat's caress, mitten, from mit, cat) and from Medieval Latin mitta, mitten (possibly from Old French mite).]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English myten, mitaine, from Old French mitan, miton, mitaine ("mitten", literally "half-glove") (Modern French mitaine), from Frankish *mitamo, *mittamo (“half”), superlative of *mitti (“midpoint”), from Proto-Germanic *midjô, *midjan (“middle, center”), from Proto-Indo-European *medʰy- (“between, in the middle, center”). Cognate with Old High German mittamo, metemo ("half, in the middle"), Old Dutch medemest ("midmost"), Old English medeme ("middling, average, median", literally "midmost, in the middle"). More at mid, middle.

Examples

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