Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. An obsolete and more original form of apron.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Perhaps Mike would also propose that we rescind the great vowel shift, and that we should no longer use the words apron or adder, because they were earlier napron and nadder, and people got a bit confused about the way they related to the indefinite article -- a napron got construed as an apron, etc.

    Peevish About Language Pet Peevishness

  • Another mark of refinement is the resort to the napron, corruptly apron, to protect the dress during the performance of kitchen work.

    Old Cookery Books and Ancient Cuisine

  • In contrast to supposed words that never did exist, are real words that exist through a mistake, such as apron and adder, where the n, which really belongs to the word itself, has been supposed, mistakenly, to belong to the article; thus apron should be napron (Fr. naperon), and adder should be nadder (A. - S. næddre).

    Literary Blunders; A chapter in the "History of Human Error"

  • In contrast to supposed words that never did exist, are real words that exist through a mistake, such as _apron_ and _adder_, where the _n_, which really belongs to the word itself, has been supposed, mistakenly, to belong to the article; thus apron should be napron (Fr. _naperon_), and adder should be nadder (A. - S. _n < ae > ddre_).

    Literary Blunders

  • Nowt even a napron, fit for thy wark as maaid at serviss; an 'parson a gettin' tha plaace at Hall!

    Stories in Light and Shadow

  • Lucrece lacketh both a hood and a napron, and thine own partlets have not yet so much as the first stitch set in them.

    Clare Avery A Story of the Spanish Armada

  • In the same way, Dent writes, a nadder, a noumpere and a napron became an 'adder,' 'umpire' and

    The Globe and Mail - Home RSS feed

  • The change from numble pie to umble pie to humble pie, attributed to "some anonymous punster in the time of William the Conqueror," was actually due to the same influences that changed a napron to an apron in the first instance and to the characteristic weakening of the initial h in English, heard today in an historical, an hilarious, etc.

    VERBATIM: The Language Quarterly Vol XI No 4

  • We could expect such a fastidious foe of provection to need no napron to eat an ewt.

    VERBATIM: The Language Quarterly Vol XIV No 3

  • Examples are an umpire < a nompere; an adder < a nadder; an apron < a napron (compare napery); and an orange < a narancia (compare Spanish naranja).

    VERBATIM: The Language Quarterly Vol IX No 3

Comments

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  • either nor(ange)?

    December 10, 2012

  • Sounds like a similar etymological tale as that of orange.

    December 10, 2012

  • "n. An obsolete and more original form of apron." The Century Dictionary is such a trendsetter.

    December 9, 2012