Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A supposed gaseous element assumed to account for the brilliant green lines in the spectrum of the nebulæ. Thus far it has not been detected on the earth, or in any of the heavenly bodies except the nebulæ.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun astronomy, physics A supposed element proposed as a result of spectral analysis of light from a nebula; the emission lines concerned are now known to be due to doubly-ionized oxygen

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • And what of that other unknown element we find glowing green in the far-flung nebulae — green as that we had just passed through — and that we call nebulium?

    The Moon Pool

  • And what of that other unknown element we find glowing green in the far-flung nebulae -- green as that we had just passed through -- and that we call nebulium?

    The Moon Pool

  • And what of that other unknown element we find glowing green in the far-flung nebulae -- green as that we had just passed through -- and that we call nebulium?

    The Moon Pool

  • The gas "nebulium," not yet found on the earth, is the most characteristic constituent of irregular nebulæ.

    The New Heavens

  • And what miracles are there in coronium and nebulium which, as the child of nebula and sun, we inherit?

    The Moon Pool

  • The 37726A line, like the nebulium line, is unknown in stellar spectra; it seems also to be confined to true nebulosity.

    Popular Science Monthly Oct, Nov, Dec, 1915 — Volume 86

  • The bright lines of nebulium have never been observed in a true star: they and the radiations in the ultra-violet known as at

    Popular Science Monthly Oct, Nov, Dec, 1915 — Volume 86

  • Many of the nebular lines are due to hydrogen, others are due to helium; but the majority, including the two on the extreme right in Fig. 13, which we attribute to the hypothetical element nebulium, and the close pair on the extreme left, have not been matched in our laboratories and, therefore, are of unknown origin.

    Popular Science Monthly Oct, Nov, Dec, 1915 — Volume 86

  • When this nebula is observed with a slitless spectrograph the hydrogen and nebulium components are seen as circular discs, but the hydrogen discs are larger than the nebulium discs.

    Popular Science Monthly Oct, Nov, Dec, 1915 — Volume 86

  • In other words, the hydrogen forms an atmosphere about the central star which extends out into space in all directions a great deal farther than the nebulium discs extend.

    Popular Science Monthly Oct, Nov, Dec, 1915 — Volume 86

Comments

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  • Poor Huggins felt silly and truly dumb

    To learn he was wrong on nebulium.

    If he had been able

    To add to the table

    The next thing he'd name was nofoolium.

    September 6, 2016