Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Done or obtained by surprise, with secrecy, or by concealment of the truth.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Done or obtained by surprise; with secrecy, or by concealment of the truth.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Done or obtained by surprise or with secrecy, falsehood, or concealment of truth.

Etymologies

Latin obreptitus. See obreption. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • We do not know its exact terms; but if it followed the drafts prepared in England for the purpose, it pronounced that the Bull of dispensation granted by Julius for the marriage of Henry with his deceased brother's wife must be declared obreptitious and consequently void, if the commissioners found that the motives alleged by Julius were insufficient and contrary to the facts.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 4: Clandestinity-Diocesan Chancery

  • Julius II was obreptitious -- i.e. obtained by false pretences.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 7: Gregory XII-Infallability

  • There can be no doubt that Clement showed much weakness in the concessions he had made to the English demands; but it must also be remembered, first, that in the decision of this point of law, the technical grounds for treating the dispensation as obreptitious were in themselves serious and, secondly, that in committing the honour of the Holy See to Campeggio's keeping, Clement had known that he had to do with a man of exceptionally high principle.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 4: Clandestinity-Diocesan Chancery

Comments

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  • obtained by trickery or by concealing the truth

    November 23, 2007