Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun In Roman antiquity, a provincial town, as distinguished from urbs, the city of Rome itself.

Etymologies

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Examples

  • Demetrius, the owner's brother, had bred and trained them -- four magnificent black Arabs -- and they excited much interest among the knowing judges who were wont to collect and lounge about the 'oppidum', as it was called, behind the 'carceres' -- [The covered sheds or stalls in which the horses were brought to wait for the start.] -- to inspect the racers, predict the winner, offer counsel to the drivers, and make bets.

    Serapis — Volume 06

  • Demetrius, the owner's brother, had bred and trained them -- four magnificent black Arabs -- and they excited much interest among the knowing judges who were wont to collect and lounge about the 'oppidum', as it was called, behind the 'carceres' -- [The covered sheds or stalls in which the horses were brought to wait for the start.] -- to inspect the racers, predict the winner, offer counsel to the drivers, and make bets.

    Serapis — Complete

  • Demetrius, the owner's brother, had bred and trained them -- four magnificent black Arabs -- and they excited much interest among the knowing judges who were wont to collect and lounge about the 'oppidum', as it was called, behind the 'carceres' -- [The covered sheds or stalls in which the horses were brought to wait for the start.] -- to inspect the racers, predict the winner, offer counsel to the drivers, and make bets.

    Complete Project Gutenberg Georg Ebers Works

  • Demetrius, the owner's brother, had bred and trained them -- four magnificent black Arabs -- and they excited much interest among the knowing judges who were wont to collect and lounge about the 'oppidum', as it was called, behind the 'carceres' -- [The covered sheds or stalls in which the horses were brought to wait for the start.] -- to inspect the racers, predict the winner, offer counsel to the drivers, and make bets.

    Serapis — Volume 06

  • Demetrius, the owner's brother, had bred and trained them -- four magnificent black Arabs -- and they excited much interest among the knowing judges who were wont to collect and lounge about the 'oppidum', as it was called, behind the 'carceres' -- [The covered sheds or stalls in which the horses were brought to wait for the start.] -- to inspect the racers, predict the winner, offer counsel to the drivers, and make bets.

    Serapis — Volume 06

  • How he hated to hear this one say that Athens outshone her as the sun does the moon, hear that one say that Pergamum on its heights was far lovelier, hear another say that Alexandria made her look like a Gallic oppidum!

    Antony and Cleopatra

  • Quid toto terrarum orbe communius? quae civitas, quod oppidum, quae familia vacat amatorum exemplis?

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  • How he hated to hear this one say that Athens outshone her as the sun does the moon, hear that one say that Pergamum on its heights was far lovelier, hear another say that Alexandria made her look like a Gallic oppidum!

    Antony and Cleopatra

  • Bene intellexi, quod in illa regione est oppidum habens muros argenteos et propugnacula aurea.

    The iournal of frier William de Rubruquis a French man of the order of the minorite friers, vnto the East parts of the worlde. An. Dom. 1253.

  • Et Cardanus: Georgius Agricola, inquit, in Elbogano tractu iuxta oppidum à falconibns cognominatum, integras cum corpore abietes in lapidem conuersas esse, atque quod maius est, in rimis etiam

    A briefe commentarie of Island, by Arngrimus Ionas

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  • "Some believed it was a monastery built by two monks to escape from the Moors; other saw it as a Visigoth citadel; still others held it to be a Hispano-Roman oppidum sometimes called Lucus Asturum, sometimes Ovetum; and finally there were those who said that it was Pelage himself (called Don Pelayo by the Spaniards, who believed him to have been King Rodriguez's old lance-bearer at Jerez, and Belaï al-Roumi by the Arabs since he was supposed to be of Roman extraction) who had founded the city."

    -- Life: A User's Manual by Georges Perec, translated by David Bellos, pp 9-10

    June 1, 2008