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Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Archaic form of pathetic.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • When he had got down upon the foot-pavement, he called out, ‘Fare you well;’ and without looking back, sprung away with a kind of pathetick briskness, if I may use that expression, which seemed to indicate a struggle to conceal uneasiness, and impressed me with a foreboding of our long, long separation.

    The Life of Samuel Johnson LL.D.

  • When he had got down upon the foot-pavement, he called out, 'Fare you well;' and without looking back, sprung away with a kind of pathetick briskness, if I may use that expression, which seemed to indicate a struggle to conceal uneasiness, and impressed me with a foreboding of our long, long separation.

    Life Of Johnson

  • But Thompson spoke from immediate experience and made his point well—despite a readiness to indulge in what he called a “pathetick apostrophe: ‘O! my country, never give up your annual elections, young men never give up your jewell!’”

    Ratification

  • Flower, &c. Besides, I have a Prison – Scene, which the Ladies always reckon charmingly pathetick.

    The Beggar's Opera

  • He could not represent a succession of pathetick images.

    Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides

  • I endeavoured to defend that pathetick and beautiful tragedy, and repeated the following passage:

    Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides

  • Let me close the scene on that unfortunate House with the elegant and pathetick reflections of Voltaire, in his Histoire

    Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides

  • He treated it with ridicule, and would not allow even the scene of the dying husband and father to be pathetick.

    Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides

  • His comick scenes are happily wrought, but his pathetick strains are always polluted with some unexpected depravations.

    Preface to Shakespeare

  • He is not long soft and pathetick without some idle conceit, or contemptible equivocation.

    Preface to Shakespeare

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