Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • adjective Of, relating to, or assisting digestion.
  • adjective Induced by or associated with the action of digestive secretions.
  • adjective Of, relating to, or involving pepsin.
  • adjective Capable of digesting.
  • noun A digestive agent.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Concerned in or pertaining to the function of digestion; specifically, pertaining to the proteolytic digestion of the stomach: as, peptic processes.
  • Promoting digestion; dietetic: as, peptic substances or rules.
  • Able to digest; having a good digestion; not dyspeptic.
  • noun A peptic substance; a digestive.
  • noun plural The organs of digestion.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun An agent that promotes digestion.
  • noun The digestive organs.
  • adjective Relating to digestion; promoting digestion; digestive.
  • adjective rare Able to digest.
  • adjective (Physiol. Chem.) Pertaining to pepsin; resembling pepsin in its power of digesting or dissolving albuminous matter; containing or yielding pepsin, or a body of like properties.
  • adjective (Med.) an erosion of the mucous membrane forming the lining of the stomach, duodenum, or lower esophagus, originally believed to be due mostly to the action of gastric juice. Recently, the bacterium Helicobacter pylori has been implicated as a causal agent in many peptic ulcers. In other cases, the use of non-steroidal antiinflammatory agents (NSAIDs) such as aspirin are believed to be to blame. Such ulcers may be treated with antibiotics or antisecretory agents that reduce stomach acidity, or both. Formerly believed to be a chronic illness that could only be managed, it is now viewed as a curable disease.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Of, pertaining to, capable of, or aiding digestion
  • adjective Of or pertaining to pepsin
  • noun An agent that promotes digestion.
  • noun in the plural The digestive organs.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adjective relating to or promoting digestion

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Latin pepticus, from Greek peptikos, digested, from peptos, from peptein, to digest; see pekw- in Indo-European roots.]

Examples

  • Each cell is a little laboratory, which concocts out of the material brought to it or near it by the blood a certain potent, biting fluid, and is hence called a peptic or digestive cell.

    Hygienic Physiology : with Special Reference to the Use of Alcoholic Drinks and Narcotics

  • - Plavix® is contraindicated in patients with active pathologic bleeding such as peptic ulcer or intracranial hemorrhage.

    Medlogs - Recent stories

  • - Plavix® is contraindicated in patients with active pathologic bleeding such as peptic ulcer or intracranial hemorrhage.

    Health News from Medical News Today

  • Perhaps lead paint does play a major role in crime; perhaps that single bacteria is the major "cause" of peptic ulcers.

    Robert Teitelman: The Causes of Systemic Disasters

  • Antacids, histamine-2 receptor antagonists (H2 blockers) and proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) are commonly prescribed for treating heartburn, gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) and peptic ulcers.

    Hyla Cass, M.D.: Is Your Medication Robbing You of Nutrients Part 2: Getting Specific

  • Research presented last week suggests that he suffered from three distinct ailments: cyclic vomiting syndrome CVS, which generally starts in childhood; Chagas' disease, a parasitic illness contracted during his five-year voyage on the HMS Beagle, and Helicobacter pylori, the bacteria now known to cause peptic ulcers.

    Solving Darwin's Medical Mystery

  • Diagnosis: Cyclic vomiting syndrome; Chagas' disease, a parasitic illness contracted during his voyage on the HMS Beagle, and Helicobacter pylori, the bacteria now known to cause peptic ulcers.

    Solving Darwin's Medical Mystery

  • It not only is highly addictive but also carries a host of health risks, including coronary artery disease, hypertension, peptic ulcer disease and fetal disorders.

    Glenn D. Braunstein, M.D.: Chew on This: The Real Dangers of Smokeless Tobacco

  • Studies have shown that breastfed babies are protected against common childhood gastrointestinal and respiratory infections, stomach cancers and peptic ulcers; have a reduced risk of depression and behavioral problems; might even have higher IQ; and are less likely to be obese later in life -- a cause championed by First Lady Michelle Obama in her Let's Move Campaign to reduce the rate of childhood obesity.

    Gina Ciagne, CLC: I.R.S. Deems Breast Pumps A Tax-Deductible Expense

  • Studies have shown that breastfed babies are protected against common childhood gastrointestinal and respiratory infections, stomach cancers and peptic ulcers; have a reduced risk of depression and behavioral problems; might even have higher IQ; and are less likely to be obese later in life -- a cause championed by First Lady Michelle Obama in her Let's Move Campaign to reduce the rate of childhood obesity.

    Gina Ciagne, CLC: I.R.S. Deems Breast Pumps A Tax-Deductible Expense

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  • from Carlyle's "Sartor Resartus"

    January 11, 2009