Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To write as a poet; to put into a poem

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. compose verses or put into verse

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The eye of love poetises ¦ all passions and activities of the senses poetise; and if we could entirely abolish this poesy, it is a question whether anything would be left to make life worth living.

    Friedrich Albert Lange

  • The birds would no longer flute to us of lost loves, but of found worms; we should realise how terribly selfish they are; we could never more quote 'Hark, hark, the lark at heaven's gate sings,' or poetise with Mr. Patmore of 'the heavenly-minded thrush.'

    Prose Fancies

  • Another will yearn for the poetic glamour, gilding realistic truth, of Giorgione; for the intensely pathetic interpretation of Lorenzo Lotto, with its unique combination of the strongest subjective and objective elements, the one serving to poetise and accentuate the other.

    The Earlier Work of Titian

  • There is no philosopher who does not poetise and paint.

    Montaigne and Shakspere

  • Had the charge of Balaclava taken place on Clapham Common, or had our gallant swordsmen replaced the donkeys on Hampstead Heath, even Tennyson would have been unable to poetise their exploits.

    Diary of the Besieged Resident in Paris

  • Mokompa, also, continued to poetise, as in days gone by, having made a safe retreat with Chimbolo, and, among other things, enshrined all the deeds of the two white men in native verse.

    Black Ivory

  • To sit at one's ease and poetise -- that is a pleasure; everybody has something agreeable to say to you, and you are always your own master.

    Andersen's Fairy Tales

  • And I apprehend that it is this exalting or etherealising attribute of beauty to which all poets, all writers who would poetise the realities of life, have unconsciously rendered homage, in the rank to which they elevate what, stripped of such attribute, would be but a gaudy idol of painted clay.

    What Will He Do with It? — Complete

  • And I appreheud that it is this exalting or etherealising attribute of beauty to which all poets, all writers who would poetise the realities of life, have unconsciously rendered homage, in the rank to which they elevate what, stripped of such attribute, would be but a gaudy idol of painted clay.

    What Will He Do with It? — Volume 07

  • But by an effort of the imagination, which likes to poetise things, we often carry over these attributes of a rational being to beings destitute of reason.

    The Works of Frederich Schiller

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