Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Same as pomade, 2.
  • To apply pomatum to, as the hair.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun A perfumed unguent or composition, chiefly used in dressing the hair; pomade.
  • transitive verb To dress with pomatum.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun pomade.
  • verb transitive To dress with pomatum.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun hairdressing consisting of a perfumed oil or ointment

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Latinization of pomade (circa 1560) to agree with Latin pōmum ("fruit").

Examples

  • [29] There was concocted in Gerard's day an ointment with the pulpe of Apples, and swine's grease, and rosewater, which was used to beautifie the face, and to take away the roughnesse of the skin, and which was called in the shops "pomatum," from the apples, "poma," whereof it was prepared.

    Herbal Simples Approved for Modern Uses of Cure

  • The extra money had gone, I couldn't exactly say how, in sundry "trifling expenditures," such as pomatum, a scarf-pin, and a steel chain for my waistcoat, all of which it had seemed no harm to indulge in, especially as they were very cheap, under my altered circumstances.

    My Friend Smith A Story of School and City Life

  • The Apple (_pomum_) has left its mark in the language in the word "pomatum," which, originally an ointment made of Apples, is now an ointment in which Apples have no part.

    The plant-lore & garden-craft of Shakespeare

  • B] [Footnote A: Joseph Ashbury, Master of the Revels, in Ireland, actor, and manager of the theatre in Dublin.] [Footnote B: Chetwood adds in a footnote: "The composition for blackening the face are ivory-black and pomatum, which is, with some pains, clean'd with fresh butter."

    The Palmy Days of Nance Oldfield

  • Because want was high, and because these wigs consumed a lot of resources, these headdresses were fabricated out of pretty sketchy stuff: “pomatum, artificial pads, and hair procured from corpses.”

    KN | Kitsune Noir » Lady Gaga’s Next Look

  • They seem to be a quite extraordinary people; Lord Granville writes from Petersburg that Lady Wodehouse's Russian maid was found eating the contents of one of her ladyship's dressing-table pots - it was castor oil pomatum for the hair!

    Fiancée

  • When I randomly opened the first volume in the Charing Cross bookshop, this is what I read: Her complexion was exquisitely fair; and it was a disadvantage to her beauty that the fashions of the day obliged her to hide the color and texture of her fine silver tresses under a load of powder and pomatum.

    The most unusual book in your house.

  • The hair of Withers was radiant with pomatum, in these days of down, and he wore kid gloves and smelt of the water of Cologne.

    Dombey and Son

  • Candide followed the old woman, though without taking courage, to a decayed house, where she gave him a pot of pomatum to anoint his sores, showed him a very neat bed, with a suit of clothes hanging by it; and set victuals and drink before him.

    Candide

  • The applicant stared; grinned at Newman Noggs, who appeared highly entertained; looked slightly round the shop, as if in depreciation of the pomatum pots and other articles of stock; took his pipe out of his mouth and gave a very loud whistle; and then put it in again, and walked out.

    Nicholas Nickleby

Comments

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  • ...ambergris is soft, waxy, and so highly fragrant and spicy, that it is largely used in perfumery, in pastiles, precious candles, hair-powders, and pomatum.

    - Melville, Moby-Dick, ch. 92

    July 29, 2008

  • Yeah, but do they know where it comes from? And are they familiar with the whole messy Drawing Restraint 9* project?

    *: with extra Björk.

    July 29, 2008

  • "It was a fortnight since my salary had been raised, but so

    far I had not a penny saved. The extra money had gone, I couldn't

    exactly say how, in sundry "trifling expenditures," such as pomatum, a

    scarf-pin, and a steel chain for my waistcoat, all of which it had

    seemed no harm to indulge in, especially as they were very cheap, under

    my altered circumstances."

    ~My Friend Smith: A Story of School and City Life, 1882.

    January 8, 2012