Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Dust; powder.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • A Middle English form of powder.
  • In heraldry, same as semé.
  • n. Powder; gunpowder.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Yves Saint Laurent’s organically pigmented bio-grain poudre tuxedo jacket and pant with an organically pigmented bio-silk satin gilet hardly sounds “crunchy”, and, of course, Michael Kors whipped up a recycled cashmere striped sweater dress and scarf for eco-fab girls on the go!

    FUTUREFASHION: Earth Pledge Remakes Fashion Week | Inhabitat

  • I admit that I spend $25 for a Lancome item called poudre something, which just means that it's powdery.

    Make-Up Tips, Part I

  • A day like this is called a poudre day; and woe to the man who tempts it unthinkingly, because the light makes the delicate mist of frost shine like silver.

    Northern Lights, Volume 4.

  • St. Nicholas, as the populace mockingly called the poudre de succession.

    The Golden Dog

  • The powder transported was called poudre de traite (transport); the people understood it as poudre de traître (traitor).

    The French Revolution - Volume 1

  • A 'poudre' day, with its steely air and fatal frost, was an ill thing in the world; but these entangling blasts, these wild curtains of snow, were desolating even unto death.

    Pierre and His People, [Tales of the Far North], Complete

  • Though winds were fierce, and travel full of peril, they kept their word, and passed along wide steppes of snow, until they entered passes of the mountains, and again into the plains; and at last one 'poudre' day, when frost was shaking like shreds of faintest silver through the air, Shon McGann's sight fled.

    Pierre and His People, [Tales of the Far North], Complete

  • Though winds were fierce, and travel full of peril, they kept their word, and passed along wide steppes of snow, until they entered passes of the mountains, and again into the plains; and at last one 'poudre' day, when frost was shaking like shreds of faintest silver through the air, Shon

    The Project Gutenberg Complete Works of Gilbert Parker

  • One example from Rembar I recall at this early hour is the origin of the English term “Piepowder Courts”, from the French pies poudre or “dusty feet”.

    The Volokh Conspiracy » The influence of French words in English legal terminology

  • Edwardian ladies also used papier poudre, which came in books of colored paper and were pressed against the cheeks or nose to remove shine, burnt matchsticks to darken eyelashes, and geranium and poppy petals to stain the lips.

    The Chemistry of Beauty | Edwardian Promenade

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