Definitions

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the office of praetor

Etymologies

From praetor +‎ -ship. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • As a final humiliation, any senator who became a tribune was automatically disqualified from standing for senior office—that is, the praetorship or the consulship.

    Imperium

  • This, indeed, in the times of the emperors, was almost the sole business of the praetors, whose dignity, as Tacitus expresses it, consisted in the idle trappings of state; whence Boethius justly terms the praetorship "an empty name, and a grievous burthen on the senatorian rank."

    The Germany and the Agricola of Tacitus

  • Now several praetorships being vacant, it was all men’s opinion, that that of the chiefest dignity, which is called the praetorship of the city, would be conferred either upon Brutus or

    The Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans

  • Her hair had grayed considerably since she had seized the praetorship, but it suited her, her quiet maturity lending her an air of confidence and authority.

    Star Trek: Typhon Pact: Rough Beasts of Empire

  • Spock had even heard some calls for the institution of some form of bipartite praetorship, but that seemed to him both unworkable and unlikely.

    Star Trek: Typhon Pact: Rough Beasts of Empire

  • So early in her praetorship, he could not know what kind of a leader she would be for the Romulan people, but he thought that she would be a good one.

    Star Trek: Typhon Pact: Rough Beasts of Empire

  • A master of that sublime science who in a supper or an assembly is placed below a magistrate displays in his countenance the surprise and indignation which Cato might be supposed to feel when he was refused the praetorship by the votes of a capricious people.

    Satyricon

  • Thither they sent Aemilius, in the quality of praetor, not with six axes, which number other praetors were accustomed to have carried before them, but with twelve; so that in his praetorship he was honored with the dignity of a consul.

    The Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans

  • But there was no disturbance during his praetorship, only what misfortune he met with in his own domestic affairs.

    The Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans

  • He had at that time the most honorable praetorship of the year, and was named for the consulship four years after, being preferred before Cassius, his competitor.

    The Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.