Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • transitive verb To preoccupy to the exclusion of other thoughts or feelings.
  • transitive verb To influence beforehand against or in favor of someone or something; prejudice.
  • transitive verb To impress favorably in advance.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To preoccupy, as ground or land; take previous possession of.
  • To preoccupy the mind or heart of; imbue beforehand with some opinion or estimate; bias; prejudice: as, his appearance and manners strongly prepossessed them in his favor.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • transitive verb To preoccupy, as ground or land; to take previous possession of.
  • transitive verb To preoccupy, as the mind or heart, so as to preclude other things; hence, to bias or prejudice; to give a previous inclination to, for or against anything; esp., to induce a favorable opinion beforehand, or at the outset.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb To preoccupy, as ground or land; to take previous possession of.
  • verb To preoccupy, as the mind or heart, so as to preclude other things; hence, to bias or prejudice; to give a previous inclination to, for or against anything; esp., to induce a favorable opinion beforehand, or at the outset.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • verb cause to be preoccupied
  • verb possess beforehand
  • verb make a positive impression (on someone) beforehand
  • verb influence (somebody's) opinion in advance

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • M. Krempe was a little squat man, with a gruff voice and a repulsive countenance; the teacher, therefore, did not prepossess me in favour of his pursuits.

    Chapter 3

  • M. Krempe was a little squat man, with a gruff voice and repulsive countenance; the teacher, therefore, did not prepossess me in favour of his doctrine.

    Chapter 2

  • M. Krempe was a little squat man, with a gruff voice and repulsive countenance; the teacher, therefore, did not prepossess me in favour of his doctrine.

    Krempe

  • I'd never felt less like venery in my life, not in that ghastly place, after the sights I'd seen, and with that obscene mob about me; even apart from that, she did not prepossess-which shows how wrong you can be.

    Isabelle

  • The ingenuous expression of countenance, noble form, and graceful attitude of the young man, failed not to prepossess in his favor the churchmen in whose presence he stood.

    The Monastery

  • This one, this king, he will prepossess from the git-go.

    Our American King

  • This one, this king, he will prepossess from the git-go.

    Our American King

  • This one, this king, he will prepossess from the git-go.

    Our American King

  • This one, this king, he will prepossess from the git-go.

    Our American King

  • As Miss Howe has actually detected our mother, and might possibly find some way still to acquaint her friend with her discoveries, I thought it proper to prepossess them in favour of

    Clarissa Harlowe

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