Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A bitter, colorless, amorphous powder or crystalline alkaloid, C20H24N2O2·3H2O, derived from certain cinchona barks and used in medicine to treat malaria.
  • noun Any of various compounds or salts of quinine.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A very important vegetable alkali (C20H24N2O2), obtained from the bark of several trees of the genus Cinchona.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Chem.) An alkaloid extracted from the bark of several species of cinchona (esp. Cinchona Calisaya) as a bitter white crystalline substance, C20H24N2O2. Hence, by extension (Med.), any of the salts of this alkaloid, as the acetate, chloride, sulphate, etc., employed as a febrifuge or antiperiodic. Called also quinia, quinina, etc.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun pharmacology A bitter colourless powder, an alkaloid derived from cinchona bark, used to treat malaria and as an ingredient of tonic water.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a bitter alkaloid extracted from chinchona bark; used in malaria therapy

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Spanish quina ("cinchona bark"), from Quechua kina.

Examples

  • Many men indulge in what we call the quinine habit.

    From Whose Bourne

  • For example, the FDA ordered a number of manufacturers to stop marketing unapproved drugs that contain quinine, which is often used to treat leg cramps.

    FDA official leads charge against dangerous unapproved prescription drugs

  • I hesitate to advise this, because I fear to induce any one to abandon quinine, which is the great weapon against malaria, and not from any want of faith in Dr. Plehn, for he has studied malarial fevers in Cameroon with the greatest energy and devotion, bringing to bear on the subject a sound German mind trained in a German way, and than this, for such subjects, no better thing exists.

    Travels in West Africa

  • In the 1790s, Hahnemann undertook an experiment with Peruvian bark, the source of quinine, which is now used to treat malaria.

    The Best Alternative Medicine

  • In the 1790s, Hahnemann undertook an experiment with Peruvian bark, the source of quinine, which is now used to treat malaria.

    The Best Alternative Medicine

  • But she had no idea whether it was even called quinine here, or how it was administered.

    Drums of Autumn

  • This infection often resists all human therapeutic measures, and is even aggravated by the use of quinine, which is given during the recurrent paroxysms of fever.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 458, October 11, 1884

  • The experiment was successful and so many trees were afterward planted that Java now furnishes about half the world's supply of quinine, which is extracted from the bark of the tree.

    Wealth of the World's Waste Places and Oceania

  • I hesitate to advise this, because I fear to induce any one to abandon quinine, which is the great weapon against malaria, and not from any want of faith in Dr. Plehn, for he has studied malarial fevers in Cameroon with the greatest energy and devotion, bringing to bear on the subject a sound German mind trained in a German way, and than this, for such subjects, no better thing exists.

    Travels in West Africa

  • Their great value depends upon the presence of certain alkaloid substances called quinine, cinchonine, and quinidine, which exist in the bark in combination with tannic and other acids.

    Catalogue of Economic Plants in the Collection of the U. S. Department of Agriculture

Comments

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  • This is what gives tonic water that funny taste I think.

    December 7, 2006

  • That is correct.

    December 7, 2006

  • nugatory, and a glass of quinine...

    August 2, 2008

  • No.

    March 24, 2009

  • That's it. No more G & T's for pilpy!

    March 24, 2009

  • What's that expression the cops are supposed use as a caution ...

    anything you do say can and will be used against you.

    Wordie's like that sometimes.

    March 24, 2009

  • Do you remember an inn, Miranda?

    And a big fruity hat, Miranda?

    Be careful how you answer, Miranda!

    Because anything that you say may be used in evidence against you, Miranda!

    March 24, 2009

  • "Quinine was the only treatment found to be effective against malaria, and in the middle of the nineteenth century malaria was a problem that determined the size and prosperity of an empire....


    But this was the era of the new alkaloid. Cinchona bark (and roots and leaves) contained not only quinine (named after the Spanish spelling of 'kina', the Peruvian word for bark) but also cinchonine, and in the next two decades, two more alkaloids were isolated from the tree, quinidine and cinchonidine. Each had a slightly different molecular structure, and none was quite as effective against malaria as pure quinine (but nevertheless sold as such). In the same period, the two Frenchmen also isolated the strychnine from St Ignatius's beans, and other chemists found other alkaloids -- caffeine in coffee beans and codeine in opium."

    Simon Garfield, Mauve: How One Man Invented a Color that Changed the World (London: Faber and Faber, Ltd., 2000), 30, 32.

    October 4, 2017