Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A show carried about in a box; a peep show.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A peep-show; a show carried about in a box.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a street show
  • n. an exhibition of pictures or objects viewed through a small hole or magnifying glass

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • They would have done so, doubt it not, if they belonged to the many who gaze on those very triumphs as on a raree-show to feed their silly wonder, or use and enjoy them without thankfulness or understanding, as the ox eats the clover thrust into his rack, without knowing or caring how it grew.

    Westward Ho!

  • Then of course we had that incredible raree-show put on by Nixon and his various well-wishers, and the thing that surprised me the most was how shocked the silent majority was that the wheels had come off.

    Again to Carthage

  • The raree-show on the patio was entertaining as always, but to Cassidy the important thing was that he was near the ocean and there was a pleasant breeze.

    Again to Carthage

  • One pretty little fellow called Wyerley, perhaps; another jiggeting rascal called Biron, a third simpering varlet of the name of Symmes, and a more hideous villain than any of the reset, with a long bag under his arm, and parchment settlements tagged to his heels, yelped Solmes: pursue her from raree-show to raree-show, shouldering upon one another at every turn, stopping when she stops, and set a spinning again when she moves.

    Clarissa Harlowe

  • It only went to show what a raree-show they were running here.

    Lord of Chaos

  • They sell the memories of their famous heroes, of their philosophers and poets, by making a raree-show of their tombs.

    The Continental Monthly, Vol. 2 No 4, October, 1862 Devoted To Literature And National Policy

  • I entered one, in which a sort of raree-show had been set up, illumed with a multitude of candles: the subject of it was the birth of Christ, who was represented in the background by a little waxen figure wrapped up in embroidery, and reclining upon an embroidered cushion, which rested upon another of pink satin.

    Christmas: Its Origin and Associations Together with Its Historical Events and Festive Celebrations During Nineteen Centuries

  • From this raree-show Father Higgins had gone home feeling that he had witnessed something about as unearthly as he was likely to be confronted with in the next world.

    Humorous Masterpieces from American Literature

  • (This latter with great surprise, for a Kafir _really_ working, now or ever, would indeed have been the raree-show of the day.)

    Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science Volume 17, No. 101, May, 1876

  • "Her tender heart," said Mr. Erwyn, "is affected by the pathetic and moving spectacle of the poor hungry swans, pining for their native land and made a raree-show for visitors in the Pantiles; and she has gone to stay them with biscuits and to comfort them with cakes."

    Gallantry Dizain des Fetes Galantes

Comments

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  • See also raree shew men.

    September 12, 2008

  • The people wanted to make a show of me! One after another, there they came, peeping in at a little window of my prison, not too capacious of daylight; and when they had looked about them, off they went! This raree show was a novelty.

    - Lesage, The Adventures of Gil Blas of Santillane, tr. Smollett, bk 1 ch. 13

    September 12, 2008

  • "'It is rare,' he said, 'to have anyone who will look at my collections as anything but a raree-show.'"
    --Patrick O'Brian, The Thirteen Gun Salute, 171

    March 4, 2008

  • One pretty little fellow called Wyerley, perhaps; another jiggeting rascal called Biron, a third simpering varlet of the name of Symmes, and a more hideous villain than any of the rest,... : pursue her from raree-show to raree-show, shouldering upon one another at every turn, stopping when she stops, and set a spinning again when she moves.

    Lovelace to Belford, Clarissa by Samuel Richardson

    January 4, 2008