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Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. smoky, dirty, squalid

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Smoky; reeky; hence, begrimed with dirt.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Tarnished with smoke; sooty; foul; squalid; filthy.

Etymologies

From reech. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • She must not let him wheedle compliance out of her 'for a pair of reechy kisses', or 'paddling in your neck with his damned fingers'.

    Shakespeare

  • I could feel the urge for his neck in my hands for one brief instant before sanity clamped down, and I considered what to do while dodging his reechy kisses.

    A Letter of Mary

  • Seest thou not, I say, what a deformed thief this fashion is? how giddily he turns about all the hot bloods between fourteen and five-and-thirty? sometime fashioning them like Pharaoh’s soldiers in the reechy painting; sometime like god Bel’s priests in the old church-window; sometime like the shaven Hercules in the smirched worm-eaten tapestry, where his cod-piece seems as massy as his club?

    Act III. Scene III. Much Ado about Nothing

  • Great men have been unfaithful to their marital vows, but it has been those of mediocre minds and india-rubber morals who have cowered at the feet of mistresses -- who have thrown their world away for reechy kisses shared by others.

    The Complete Works of Brann the Iconoclast, Volume 1.

  • Accordingly, we meet in Shakspeare _reckless_ and _rechless_, _reeky_ and _reechy_; "As I could _pike_ (pitch) my lance."

    Notes and Queries, Number 185, May 14, 1853 A Medium of Inter-communication for Literary Men, Artists, Antiquaries, Genealogists, etc.

  • He points out where the various family members slept, including a reechy loft for the unmarried girls.

    The Full Feed from HuffingtonPost.com

  • There goes 'the seld shown flamen, _puffing_ his way to _win a vulgar station_,' here is a 'veiled dame' who lets us see that 'war of white and damask in her nicely gawded cheeks,' a moment; -- look at that 'kitchen malkin,' peering over the wall there with 'her richest lockram' 'pinned on her reechy neck,' eyeing the hero as he passes; and look at this poor baby here, this Elizabethan baby, saved, conserved alive, crying himself

    The Philosophy of the Plays of Shakspere Unfolded

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