Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • intransitive verb To fill or make complete again; add a new stock or supply to.
  • intransitive verb To inspire or nourish.
  • intransitive verb To become full again.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To fill again; hence, to fill completely; stock.
  • To finish; complete; consummate; perfect.
  • To revive.
  • To recover former fullness.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • intransitive verb obsolete To recover former fullness.
  • transitive verb To fill again after having been diminished or emptied; to stock anew; hence, to fill completely; to cause to abound.
  • transitive verb obsolete To finish; to complete; to perfect.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb To refill; to renew; to supply again or to add a fresh quantity.
  • verb archaic To fill; to complete; to supply fully.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • verb fill something that had previously been emptied

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English replenisshen, from Old French replenir, repleniss- : re-, re- + plenir, to fill (from plein, full, from Latin plēnus; see pelə- in Indo-European roots).]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English replenisshen, from Old French repleniss-, stem of some of the conjugated forms of replenir, from re- + plenir, from plein, from Latin plenus.

Examples

  • If I’m out and my diaper bag runs out I can replenish from the car.

    Hold The Mustard | Her Bad Mother

  • In 1965, Dr. Robert Cade, a specialist in kidney disease, created Gatorade for the University of Florida football team the Gators, hence the name to replenish the water and electrolytes that athletes lost when they sweated.

    The Rule of Three

  • In 1965, Dr. Robert Cade, a specialist in kidney disease, created Gatorade for the University of Florida football team the Gators, hence the name to replenish the water and electrolytes that athletes lost when they sweated.

    The Rule of Three

  • With numbers like that, there is little reason for employers to "replenish" a trust fund that is already flowing over.

    Lone Star Statement

  • They are actually having to regroup right now, bring up sort of their heavy duty breathing apparatus to kind of replenish the oxygen supplies.

    CNN Transcript Jan 3, 2006

  • The length of time it takes him to "replenish" his library (with your books) strikes you as pathetic.

    Ponkapog Papers.

  • To 'replenish' the earth is to give out love ungrudgingly to all Nature, -- to 'subdue' the earth, is first, to master the atoms of which the human organisation is composed, and hold them completely under control, so that by means of this mastery, all other atomic movements and forces upon this planet and its encircling atmosphere may be equally controlled.

    The Life Everlasting; a reality of romance

  • The length of time it takes him to "replenish" his library (with your books) strikes you as pathetic.

    Ponkapog Papers

  • David Liddiment, the Trust member who explained it, says "replenish" with all the confident delight of Cheryl Cole on those hair dye commercials.

    Telegraph.co.uk - Telegraph online, Daily Telegraph and Sunday Telegraph

  • So Radio 4 must "replenish" its 35- to 50-year-old listenership by changing its tone of voice and understanding a wider range of concerns.

    Telegraph.co.uk - Telegraph online, Daily Telegraph and Sunday Telegraph

Comments

New comments are temporarily disabled while we update our database.