Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. General state or disposition of the body or mind, or of one thing with regard to other things; habitude.
  • n. A figure of speech whereby the mental habitude of an adversary or opponent is feigned for the purpose of arguing against him; mocking by imitating another's speech.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. General state or disposition of the body or mind, or of one thing with regard to other things; habitude.
  • n. A figure of speech whereby the mental habitude of an adversary or opponent is feigned for the purpose of arguing against him.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. General state or disposition of the body or mind, or of one thing with regard to other things; habitude.
  • n. In rhetoric, a statement of what is considered to be the adversary's habitude of mind, by way of argument against him.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Ancient Greek σχέσις (skhesis, "state, condition, attitude"). See scheme.

Examples

  • If this is true, then I think that we are in a condition to consider the names ron (stream), ienai (to go), schesis (retention), about which you were asking; and we may see whether the namer has grasped the nature of them in letters and syllables in such a manner as to imitate the essence or not.

    The CRATYLUS

  • To know that a thing shall not be, and to determine that it shall be, is a schesis rather beseeming a half frantic creature than the infinitely wise Creator.

    The Doctrine of the Saints��� Perseverance Explained and Confirmed

  • For the latter relation is essentially a pros ti schesis, an ordo ad, which implies (1) a subject to which it belongs, (23) a special something in that subject on account of which it is predicated, and

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 12: Philip II-Reuss

  • SOCRATES: If this is true, then I think that we are in a condition to consider the names ron (stream), ienai (to go), schesis (retention), about which you were asking; and we may see whether the namer has grasped the nature of them in letters and syllables in such a manner as to imitate the essence or not.

    Cratylus

Comments

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  • JM vows never to indulge in schesis.

    February 1, 2009

  • Mocking another's accent or manner.

    May 16, 2008