Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun Revenue or a profit taken from the minting of coins, usually the difference between the value of the bullion used and the face value of the coin.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Something claimed by the sovereign or by a superior as a prerogative; specifically, an ancient royalty or prerogative of the crown, whereby it claimed a percentage upon bullion brought to the mint to be coined or to be exchanged for coin; the difference between the cost of a mass of bullion and the face-value of the pieces coined from it.
  • noun A royalty; a share of profit; especially, the money received by an author from his publisher for copyright of his works.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun Something claimed or taken by virtue of sovereign prerogative; specifically, a charge or toll deducted from bullion brought to a mint to be coined; the difference between the cost of a mass of bullion and the value as money of the pieces coined from it.
  • noun A share of the receipts of a business taken in payment for the use of a right, as a copyright or a patent.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun All the revenue obtained by a feudal lord from his vassals.
  • noun The revenue obtained directly by minting coin (difference between cost of metal and face value).
  • noun The revenue obtained by the difference between interest earned on securities acquired in exchange for bank notes and the costs of producing and distributing those notes.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun charged by a government for coining bullion

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English seigneurage, from Old French, from seignor, seignior; see seignior.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From French seigneur ("feudal lord").

Examples

  • In fact, this new model brought two main advantages to the US: in on hand the revenues from the money creation itself called seigniorage and on the other hand the possibility to hold a trade deficit for a very long time.

    FXstreet.com

  • This gain, called seigniorage, is an implicit tax on the people's cash balances.

    Inflation Doesn't Pay The Government Like It Used To

  • The problem with this second option, he points out, is that in a highly developed financial system such as ours, the federal government's gain from printing money, what economists call seigniorage, is quite small.

    Hummel Predicts U.S. Government Default, David Henderson | EconLog | Library of Economics and Liberty

  • The problem with this second option, he points out, is that in a highly developed financial system such as ours, the federal government's gain from printing money, what economists call seigniorage, is quite small.

    Hummel Predicts U.S. Government Default, David Henderson | EconLog | Library of Economics and Liberty

  • Dollarized Latins would lose control over their own interest rates and be hit with hefty bills known as seigniorage, a kind of fee countries pay for using someone else's money.

    Dollars And Discontent

  • (Extracting profits from the manufacturing of money is called seigniorage, after seigneur -- "lord" in French.)

    The New Coin Of The Realm

  • The savings projected by the office come from the fact that coins and bills cost less than their face value to make, so the government gains value, known as seigniorage, with each one produced.

    NYT > Home Page

  • The savings projected by the office come from the fact coins and bills cost less than their face value to make, so the government gains value, known as seigniorage, with each one produced.

    The Seattle Times

  • Though not often discussed in polite company, seigniorage, that is, the ability to coin or print cash (the right held by a feudal seigneur) and have other folks hold it, is valuable: Those who hold the $100 bills have, for many, many years, been providing a substantial loan to the U.S. government -- and it's interest free!

    AlterNet.org Main RSS Feed

  • Though not often discussed in polite company, seigniorage, that is, the ability to coin or print cash (the right held by a feudal seigneur) and have other folks hold it, is valuable: Those who hold the $100 bills have, for many, many years, been providing a substantial loan to the U.S. government -- and it's interest free!

    AlterNet.org Main RSS Feed

Comments

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  • I wonder if this word has anything in common with agio?

    February 5, 2013