Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective slang, UK Penniless, poor, impecunious, broke.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adjective lacking funds

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The word skint would be an accurate description of my fiscal situation.

    Archive 2008-11-01

  • By the way, if you're wondering about the British-ism in the first sentence, "skint" is slang for "broke," as in: got no money.

    RELIGION Blog | dallasnews.com

  • By the way, if you're wondering about the British-ism in the first sentence, "skint" is slang for "broke," as in: got no money.

    RELIGION Blog | dallasnews.com

  • Redknapp also observed that Portsmouth had spent "decent money" last summer, well after his departure, despite people saying that they were "skint".

    The Guardian World News

  • After the plan went wrong, he had telephoned emergency services in a drunken state and said he had acted because he was "skint".

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  • After the plan went wrong, he had telephoned emergency services in a drunken state and said he had acted because he was "skint".

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  • The mother-of-four has struggled financially in recent months and said she was "skint".

    mirror.co.uk - Home

  • After the plan went wrong, he had telephoned emergency services in a drunken state and said he had acted because he was "skint".

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  • JJB were skint, meaning revenue dropped from 600m to 178m due to not being able to get stock

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  • It was claimed that after fleeing the property, Kilcullen drunkenly telephoned police and said he had carried out the attack because he was "skint".

    PinkNews.co.uk

Comments

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  • "Partway through the making of “Dummy,�? released in 1994, they brought in Mr. Utley, who had been what he calls a “skint�? — which means barely getting by — jazz guitarist."

    The New York Times, After a Decade Away, Portishead Floats Back, by Jon Pareles, April 13, 2008

    April 14, 2008

  • An uptight, desperate word that has fallen upon straightened times.

    May 10, 2008

  • Shint has it even worse!

    April 16, 2009