Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • adjective Of, relating to, or consisting of spondees.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • In ancient prosody: Of or pertaining to a spondee; constituting a spondee; consisting of spondees.
  • Having a spondee in the fifth place: noting a dactylic hexameter of the exceptional form the fifth foot being regularly a dactyl.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • adjective Of or pertaining to a spondee; consisting of spondees.
  • adjective Containing spondees in excess; marked by spondees.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective poetry Having or relating to spondees.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adjective of or consisting of spondees

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[French spondaïque, from Late Latin spondaicus, alteration of spondīacus, from Greek spondeiakos, from spondeios, spondee; see spondee.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Latin spondaicus, spondiacus, Ancient Greek σπονδειακός (spondeiakos, "(music) used at a libation").

Examples

  • But the beauty of the descriptions in _Evangeline_ and the pathos -- somewhat too drawn out -- of the story made it dear to a multitude of readers who cared nothing about the technical disputes of Poe and other critics as to whether or not Longfellow's lines were sufficiently "spondaic" to truthfully represent the quantitative hexameters of Homer and Vergil.

    Brief History of English and American Literature

  • But the beauty of the descriptions in _Evangeline_ and the pathos -- somewhat too drawn out -- of the story made it dear to a multitude of readers who cared nothing about the technical disputes of Poe and other critics as to whether or not Longfellow's lines were sufficiently "spondaic" to represent truthfully the quantitative hexameters of Homer and Vergil.

    Initial Studies in American Letters

  • Consideration of the most common of those variations, the spondaic (two stressed) and the pyrrhic (two unstressed), which are often found together forming what some have called the ionic foot, completes the chapter walking us into consideration of the line.

    THE PROSODY HANDBOOK: A GUIDE TO POETIC FORM by ROBERT BEUM & KARL SHAPIRO

  • For this, I say the line is almost entirely spondaic.

    Patrick Rosal reads Robert Hayden

  • If you read aloud the lines containing this word at the beginnings of the first two quatrains, you will hear something between resigned bitterness and sad determination conveyed by the spondaic stress on the first “must,” and a firmer, mounting determination in the second “must.”

    Annie Finch reads Claude McKay

  • For this, I say the line is almost entirely spondaic.

    Archive 2008-10-01

  • If you read aloud the lines containing this word at the beginnings of the first two quatrains, you will hear something between resigned bitterness and sad determination conveyed by the spondaic stress on the first “must,” and a firmer, mounting determination in the second “must.”

    Archive 2008-10-01

  • In the series of dactylic lines 17-22, Catullus no doubt intended to convey the idea of rapidity, as, in the spondaic line immediately following, of labour.

    Poems and Fragments

  • In the series of dactylic lines 17-22, Catullus no doubt intended to convey the idea of rapidity, as, in the spondaic line immediately following, of labour.

    Poems and Fragments

  • It's the half line "bare ruined choirs" -- especially with its spondaic first foot -- that gets me. dhawhee commented at 8:15 AM~

    Ferule & Fescue

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