Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A base or support, especially a platform on which hay or straw is stacked.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To leave the staddles in, as a wood when it is cut.
  • To form into staddles, as hay.
  • noun A prop or support; a staff; a crutch.
  • noun The frame or support of a stack of hay or grain; a stack-stand.
  • noun A young or small tree left uncut when others are cut down.
  • noun In agriculture, one of the separate plots into which a cock of hay is shaken out for the purpose of drying.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • transitive verb rare To leave the staddles, or saplings, of, as a wood when it is cut.
  • transitive verb engraving To form into staddles, as hay.
  • noun Anything which serves for support; a staff; a prop; a crutch; a cane.
  • noun engraving The frame of a stack of hay or grain.
  • noun engraving A row of dried or drying hay, etc.
  • noun A small tree of any kind, especially a forest tree.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun archaic A prop or support; a staff, crutch.
  • noun The lower part or supporting frame of a stack, a stack-stand.
  • noun Any supporting framework or base.
  • noun A small tree; sapling.
  • noun agriculture One of the separate plots into which a cock of hay is shaken out for the purpose of drying.
  • verb To form staddles of hay.
  • verb forestry to mark a sapling to be spared during a cut down of trees

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a base or platform on which hay or corn is stacked

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English stathel, from Old English stathol; see stā- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English stathel, from Old English staþol ("foundation, base, support, position, site, estate"), from Proto-Germanic *staþulaz (“position, standing”), from Proto-Indo-European *stā-, *sth- (“to stand”). Cognate with Middle Low German stadel ("barn"), German Stadel ("ground, croft, stall, shed"), Old Danish stedel ("ground, croft"), Icelandic stöðull ("position"). More at stand.

Examples

Comments

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  • It had no foundations; it stood two metres off the ground on a set of staddle stones.

    —Jeanette Winterson, Lighthousekeeping

    And at last I find out the name for an everyday object: those stone mushrooms barns sit on.

    February 17, 2009

  • Positively plinthy.

    March 22, 2012

  • Compare stalwart.

    December 15, 2018