Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun etc. See steadfast, etc.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Rare spelling of steadfast.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Our faith has to be "stedfast," firm, solid, impenetrable like a wall.

    The Epistles of St. Peter

  • Our faith has to be "stedfast," a rampart of assurance, close, compact, and invulnerable.

    The Epistles of St. Peter

  • Despite his movement's now legitimate role inside the U.S.-allied government, al-Sadr remains stedfast in his opposition to the U.S. presence in Iraq, and showed no signs Saturday of being open to the Americans sticking around.

    Iraqi Cleric Muqtada al-Sadr: "Resist The US By All Means Necessary"

  • Despite his movement's now legitimate role inside the U.S.-allied government, al-Sadr remains stedfast in his opposition to the U.S. presence in Iraq, and showed no signs Saturday of being open to the Americans sticking around.

    Iraqi Cleric Muqtada al-Sadr: "Resist The US By All Means Necessary"

  • He has been stedfast in his message since then and that's what I like about and i hope he wins.

    Clinton more conciliatory on final day

  • Similarly it may be said — not as an ingenious speculation, but as a stedfast and absolute fact — that human calculation cannot limit the influence of one atom of wholesome knowledge patiently acquired, modestly possessed, and faithfully used.

    Speeches: Literary and Social

  • Which hope we have as an anchor of the soul, both sure and stedfast, and which entereth into that within the veil;

    Probably Just One Of Those Funny Coincidences

  • For we are made partakers of Christ, if we hold the beginning of our confidence stedfast unto the end;

    Probably Just One Of Those Funny Coincidences

  • Nevertheless he that standeth stedfast in his heart, having no necessity, but hath power over his own will, and hath so decreed in his heart that he will keep his virgin, doeth well.

    Probably Just One Of Those Funny Coincidences

  • You say you are concerned for her honour: what must we, what can we say in her behalf, if she be reflected upon as a love-sick girl, who, though stedfast in her religion, could refuse men of the first consideration, all of her own religion and country, and let a foreigner, an English-man, carry her oif?

    Sir Charles Grandison

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