Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun Greek Mythology A loud-voiced Greek herald in the Iliad.
  • noun One with a loud or piercing voice.
  • noun Any of several trumpet-shaped ciliate protozoans of the genus Stentor, living in freshwater habitats and feeding chiefly on smaller microorganisms.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A person having a very powerful voice.
  • noun In mammalogy: The ursine howler, Mycetes ursinus, a platyrrhine monkey of South America; an alouate; any species of Mycetes. See cut under howler.
  • noun [capitalized] The genus of howlers: same as Mycetes.
  • noun In Protozoa: A trumpet-animalcule, or so-called funnel-like polyp.
  • noun [capitalized] The typical genus of Stentoridæ, of elongate, trumpetlike, or infundibuliform figure, with rounded peristome.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun A herald, in the Iliad, who had a very loud voice; hence, any person having a powerful voice.
  • noun (Zoöl.) Any species of ciliated Infusoria belonging to the genus Stentor and allied genera, common in fresh water. The stentors have a bell-shaped, or cornucopia-like, body with a circle of cilia around the spiral terminal disk. See Illust. under Heterotricha.
  • noun (Zoöl.) A howling monkey, or howler.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun a person with a powerful or stentorian voice
  • noun A howler monkey.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun any of several trumpet-shaped ciliate protozoans that are members of the genus Stentor
  • noun a speaker with an unusually loud voice
  • noun the mythical Greek warrior with an unusually loud voice who died after losing a shouting contest with Hermes

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Greek Stentōr. Sense 3, from New Latin Stentōr, genus name, from Greek Stentōr, Stentor (in reference to their trumpetlike shape).]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Latin Stentōr, from Ancient Greek Στέντωρ (Stentor), the name of a herald in the Iliad who had a loud voice.

Examples

  • Fond of a drink, which may have been the cause of her loud behaviour, Elizabeth was described as Amazonian, of huge size, with masculine features and the voice of a stentor.12 It seems clear to us in the twenty-first century that Charlotte and Elizabeth were harmless eccentrics who certainly did not belong in a mental hospital, or even in custody.

    Bedlam

  • Fond of a drink, which may have been the cause of her loud behaviour, Elizabeth was described as Amazonian, of huge size, with masculine features and the voice of a stentor.12 It seems clear to us in the twenty-first century that Charlotte and Elizabeth were harmless eccentrics who certainly did not belong in a mental hospital, or even in custody.

    Bedlam

  • Fond of a drink, which may have been the cause of her loud behaviour, Elizabeth was described as Amazonian, of huge size, with masculine features and the voice of a stentor.12 It seems clear to us in the twenty-first century that Charlotte and Elizabeth were harmless eccentrics who certainly did not belong in a mental hospital, or even in custody.

    Bedlam

  • Once more opening his mouth and shutting his eyes, and laughing like a stentor, Kit gradually backed to the door, and roared himself out.

    The Old Curiosity Shop

  • November 30th, 2004 at 4:39 pm i agree with stentor and mythago, and posted a response on my blog much more wordy than the succinct comments :.

    Hereville page 18 is up!

  • “A stentor, me ignorant broth of a boy!” cried Mrs. Tarleton, aping his brogue.

    Gone with the Wind

  • “A stentor, me ignorant broth of a boy!” cried Mrs. Tarleton, aping his brogue.

    Gone with the Wind

  • “A stentor, me ignorant broth of a boy!” cried Mrs. Tarleton, aping his brogue.

    Gone with the Wind

  • “A stentor, me ignorant broth of a boy!” cried Mrs. Tarleton, aping his brogue.

    Gone with the Wind

  • “A stentor, me ignorant broth of a boy!” cried Mrs. Tarleton, aping his brogue.

    Gone with the Wind

Comments

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  • In Greek mythology, Stentor (Στεντω�?) was a herald of the Greek forces during the Trojan War. His name has given rise to the adjective meaning loud-voiced, for which he was famous. Homer said his "voice was as powerful as fifty voices of other men".

    October 31, 2007

  • sTENtOR

    June 15, 2008