Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • adjective Characterized by movement of the lips or other speech organs without making audible sounds.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • Same as subtonic.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Of or pertaining words or statements formed in thought and expressed inwardly but not, or not yet, uttered aloud.
  • adjective phonetics, dated Of or pertaining to imperfectly articulated speech that is inaudible or barely audible; subtonic.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • So once again, too, with such a textual effect in subvocal mind, a compelling line of descent sketches itself between Romantic visionary enterprise and

    Phonemanography: Romantic to Victorian

  • Literary evidence on this point concerns the way voice returns from its requisite linguistic suppression by wording only in subvocal reading.

    Phonemanography: Romantic to Victorian

  • Unless we are reading for the poetic qualities of the babbling — rhythm, rhyme and other such formal patterning in the verbal figuration — the articulation may not just be subvocal but subliminal, maybe even wholly absent.

    Archive 2009-07-01

  • The subvocal note/dɔɡz/is not bound to a singular icon but rather evokes a montage of many — bull-dog, doberman, rottweiller — overlaid like the images of an experimental film.

    Notes on Notes

  • Unless we are reading for the poetic qualities of the babbling — rhythm, rhyme and other such formal patterning in the verbal figuration — the articulation may not just be subvocal but subliminal, maybe even wholly absent.

    Notes on Notes

  • The subvocal note/dɔɡz/is not bound to a singular icon but rather evokes a montage of many — bull-dog, doberman, rottweiller — overlaid like the images of an experimental film.

    Archive 2009-07-01

  • As already excerpted above, the question is so rhetorical that the present essay wants to imagine some part of its answer as lying with the phonemic underlay and ligatures of rhetoric's own subvocal figurations.

    Phonemanography: Romantic to Victorian

  • In the unconscious energy field of phonemic circuitry and its short-outs within the subvocal production of literary meaning, the double-cross can precipitate a visionary option or knot off an ironic one.

    Phonemanography: Romantic to Victorian

  • In such moments we discover, but only by evincing it in ourselves, the productivity of text as subvocal performance.

    Phonemanography: Romantic to Victorian

  • Rephrasing Agamben: If it does indeed seem "possible, in other words, to call into question the principle of conditioned necessity," wouldn't it be precisely the "other words" of ontology's linguistic equivalent in vexed groundedness that might help acquaint us with the rhythm of all such suspended negativity, help us practice it, so to speak — by entertaining that othering from within that is the very function of literary words in subvocal speaking?

    Phonemanography: Romantic to Victorian

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